Works exhibited at Matir Manush. Photos: courtesy of the EMK CenterThe EMK Centre's virtual solo exhibition, "Matir Manush", presents "> Works exhibited at Matir Manush. Photos: courtesy of the EMK CenterThe EMK Centre's virtual solo exhibition, "Matir Manush", presents ">

The solo exhibition ‘Matir Manush’ offers a living look at simple lives

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Works exhibited at Matir Manush. Photos: courtesy of the EMK Center

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Works exhibited at Matir Manush. Photos: courtesy of the EMK Center

The EMK Centre’s virtual solo exhibition, “Matir Manush”, presents the works of young artist Md Rasel Rana. The 41 works of art on display present the tradition, culture, celebrations and daily life of Bengalis in a whimsical way.

Clay utensils, puppets, and centerpieces are some of the oldest domestic works of art in our culture. One of the subcategories of these clay dolls is a terracotta sculpture, commonly known as “Tepa Putul”. Rasel’s digital illustration series is created using characters from this concept.

“Matir Manush is a widely used proverb indicating people of simple and genuine mind. Through my works, I have attempted to visually present the good and the bad in people, and their state of mind,” he said. -he explains.

Rasel received his BA and MA in Graphic Design from Dhaka University and is currently working as a lecturer in the Department of Fine Arts at Jagannath University. “My fascination with ‘Tepa Putul’ started at a young age as they are an important and popular part of our tradition. I tried to transform this clay doll shape into a variety of images, shapes of design, movement, character designs and illustrations, “he explained.

Rasel used native vivid colors and shapes to paint the real-life storyline of “Matir Manush” through various situations. The first illustration, “Boishakh 1427”, premiered in 2020 and initially he limited his works to themes related to the pandemic and the lockdown. These also contain an illustration depicting the plight of poor communities.

The series, “Tradition”, shows the traditional Bangladeshi rickshaw art, indigenous dance forms and our beautiful tailoring. nakshi kantha. Rasel considers Shilpacharya Zainul Abedin as his inspiration and has paid homage to the eminent artist through some of his illustrations. Some illustrations also include Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman and Sheikh Russell.

In one of these illustrations, a sick man is seen lying down and no one has come forward to help him. A photojournalist, pictured using a clay doll, stepped forward as others watch and click pictures. This was part of a collage titled ‘Situation’ and features illustrations on other social issues.

A number of illustrations have visualized the journey of people during the Eid holidays, while others have depicted the misery of the flood-prone areas. Rasel’s artwork also depicts various special days, including Father’s Day, Mother’s Day, Victory Day, Environment Day, Dhaka University Day, and Labor Day.

Through this exhibition, EMK Center wishes to promote digital illustration to the public while commemorating the 50th anniversary of the independence of Bangladesh and the ninth anniversary of the EMK Center. The exhibition is available on the EMK Center website until October 15.

The author is a medical student and a freelance journalist who enjoys reading, doodling and blogging. Email: [email protected]


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