Visual Art – Akademija Art http://akademija-art.net/ Fri, 08 Oct 2021 21:31:20 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://akademija-art.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-150x150.png Visual Art – Akademija Art http://akademija-art.net/ 32 32 Gene Simmons explains why he hid his art all these years https://akademija-art.net/gene-simmons-explains-why-he-hid-his-art-all-these-years/ https://akademija-art.net/gene-simmons-explains-why-he-hid-his-art-all-these-years/#respond Fri, 08 Oct 2021 21:03:00 +0000 https://akademija-art.net/gene-simmons-explains-why-he-hid-his-art-all-these-years/ LAS VEGAS (KTNV) – Gene Simmons is about to do something in Las Vegas that he’s never done before in the world – inviting people to see his artwork. “Believe it or not, I paint,” he said, not talking about face makeup or stage makeup at all. While the frontman of KISS has put on […]]]>

LAS VEGAS (KTNV) – Gene Simmons is about to do something in Las Vegas that he’s never done before in the world – inviting people to see his artwork.

“Believe it or not, I paint,” he said, not talking about face makeup or stage makeup at all.

While the frontman of KISS has put on wild shows and shared his artistic abilities through rock ‘n’ roll for decades, he has also quietly created visual arts outside of the limelight.

Richard Drew / ASSOCIATE PRESS

Gene Simmons, bassist of Kiss, prepares to breathe fire during the crescendo of “Firehouse”, a number played at a concert in Hartford, Connecticut, on February 18, 1977. Make-up, smoke bombs, flash pots and theft sparks are a regular part of their show. (AP Photo / Richard Drew)

“I thought nobody cared”

Simmons has been drawing since he was 8 years old.

“I have hundreds and hundreds of what I call doodles,” he explained. “So it’s a combination of pen and ink, markers, paint, watercolors, graffiti spray cans, whatever I can get my hands on.”

His very first public art exhibition, Gene Simmons ArtWorks, will take place on October 22 and 23 inside the Animazing Gallery at the Venetian Hotel and Casino.

The gallery’s exhibition was originally scheduled for October 15-16 following a private VIP event on October 14. In early September, it was announced that Simmons and his teammate Paul Stanley had both tested positive for COVID-19, postponing several dates on the “End of the road” group.

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Gene Simmons

Simmons has since recovered, the KISS tour is back, and he’s finally ready to share his art with the world at the gallery exhibition just ahead of KISS’s new home in Las Vegas. Ironically, while the coronavirus may have temporarily interrupted his art debut, this is in many ways why he has a gallery exhibition as well.

“I thought no one cared,” Simmons said when asked why he chose not to showcase his art for all these years. He says taking a break from touring during the pandemic has helped reignite his passion.

“The pandemic has given me the chance to be in Canada with few people or media and give in to my, you know, kind of private and secret dreams,” he said. “That is, I have scribbled my whole life.”

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Gene Simmons

Simmons took his art out of storage, closed himself off to the rest of the world, and began to experiment.

“I was like, well, why don’t I dive into the bottom of the pool and see what I can do with acrylic, paint and other materials,” he explained. . “And that’s what I did.”

“I have no style”

Simmons has no professional training and says he takes inspiration from artists ranging from Jackson Pollock to Andy Warhol to even comics, and it shows. There is a lot of variety in his pieces.

“I don’t have a style. I don’t have one. I’ve been called so many times,” he said with a laugh. “Gene, you have no style!” “

While it is true that his art spans many different genres, it is almost as if “no style” is his style. If there’s one thing I learned from talking to him, Gene Simmons is a real rock star and he does what he wants.

Gene Simmons: “I live my life this way. Here, ask me a question. Ask me what time it is.”

Producer Amy Abdelayed: “What time is it?

Simmons: “Glad you asked me that question.” October 14 [now rescheduled to Oct. 22-23], we’re going to be here on Animazing – no matter what anyone asks you, just say what you want to say.

This philosophy is reflected in his work.

“There are no rules. Whether you write songs or books, or create stuff,” Simmons said.

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Gene Simmons

“I watch every day because it might be the only day I’ll be alive. Use it! Play, have fun, enjoy life.”

Simmons says the intention behind his artwork is pretty straightforward.

“Try to make the day less boring by doing cool stuff.”

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Gene Simmons

His approach to art is not to think about it too much.

“Sometimes the best thing to do is put a backpack on your back and go on a trip without knowing where you are going.”

“I really didn’t know what I was doing,” he said. “But I love this.”

Learn more about his art exhibit, which promises to include personal appearances by Simmons, at Animazing.com. There you can also RSVP, which the gallery says is mandatory.

This story is taken from our “Las Vegas Art Scene” segment in our brand new dedicated digital show “How to Vegas”. Watch “How to Vegas” at 10:30 p.m. on Fridays – and throughout the weekend – using the KTNV app on your favorite streaming device.

MORE STORIES FROM THIS SEGMENT:


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Talk to the great and prolific Wayne White about his Radio Magic Eightball | Visual art https://akademija-art.net/talk-to-the-great-and-prolific-wayne-white-about-his-radio-magic-eightball-visual-art/ https://akademija-art.net/talk-to-the-great-and-prolific-wayne-white-about-his-radio-magic-eightball-visual-art/#respond Thu, 07 Oct 2021 10:00:00 +0000 https://akademija-art.net/talk-to-the-great-and-prolific-wayne-white-about-his-radio-magic-eightball-visual-art/ “Shitshow at sea”, Wayne White Wayne White grew up in Chattanooga and helped create a children’s TV show in Nashville before bringing his wacky vision to the iconic Pee-wee’s playhouse. These days, White is best known for his large public art installations of giant puppet heads – the genre that has been showcased to his […]]]>






“Shitshow at sea”, Wayne White


Wayne White grew up in Chattanooga and helped create a children’s TV show in Nashville before bringing his wacky vision to the iconic Pee-wee’s playhouse. These days, White is best known for his large public art installations of giant puppet heads – the genre that has been showcased to his Wayne-O-Rama takes place in Chattanooga in 2016 and 2017.

White’s word paintings have also become iconic works, and the Julia Martin Gallery is currently hosting a new exhibition of White’s paintings and sculptures titled Radio Magic Eightball. He kicked off the show on Saturday with an opening reception and a performance by his new band Username Password, and the work will be on display until November 27. Scene recently spoke with White about his new art and his three-string guitar – and also asked him what was so cubist about the pandemic.

Tthis is your second exhibition at the Julia Martin gallery. How did you get connected?

I connected with Julia through Daniel [Lonow] to the Country Music Hall of Fame. Daniel works with the gallery there, Haley Gallery of Hatch Show Print. [Lonow is also the curator at Julia Martin Gallery.] It was in 2018 I believe. I did a country music show with a lot of country music portraits and a giant George Jones puppet.

I just read about it. Was that obviously the biggest giant head of George Jones ever made?

Well, no, that was in 2009 at Rice University in Houston. I made a smaller version for Daniel, plus a full body. The rice was just a giant head.

For this show at Julia’s, you return to your paintings of words.

Yes, it’s a word painting show. They are mostly new paintings of words. I try new things, I try wall reliefs – little pop-art cubist relief versions of relief walls of the word paintings. I do stuff on paper, then the classic thrift store reproduction word paintings and a few other little sculptural things.






artThe Fuck blue, pink.jpg

“The Fuck”, Wayne White


I saw an image of one of the wall reliefs. I don’t remember if he was like, like “Fuck It?”

“The fuck.”

What are they made of? How did you develop them?

Yes, these are from the beginning of this year, and I have never shown them anywhere. And this will be the first of those on the wall. And these are just an exploration of cubism. I kind of cut out the frames and glued them back together in a fractured fashion. I had all these letters that I had laser cut from MDF board, which looks like Masonite. I had all these letters lying around that I wanted to play with in one way or another. And so it’s really just my nod to cubism, really fracturing space and putting it back together. I wanted to kind of express the fractured year we’ve all been through, and the exasperation and kind of blurring of all of our worlds. It was like an expression of that, I guess. But really, they’re just on another level too – they’re just my continued exploration of trying to find a new way to really make the words paintings. I am always looking for a new variant.

You always find new ways to combine elements of a “low” popular culture with “higher” art ideas. These days you’re sort of in a postmodern golden age where everyone is mixing it all up anyway, but you always have. I find it interesting that you make sculptures of country music stars in an artistic context, and at the same time combine materials like MDF with these secular phrases, and then use them to explore something like cubism. How much is this just instinct for you? How much does an agenda cost?

I would say everything is instinctive. I don’t have an overriding agenda. Once I decide on a direction, I create a little program, I guess, just to structure it, don’t I? But I kind of give myself permission to experiment or try whatever I really want to do without worrying about how it fits into the Wayne White brand. Although I am very much aware of the Wayne White brand, I have now been doing these word paintings for 21 years. And so I know a lot of people immediately identify me with them, so there’s this problem, which is a good thing to have. It’s good to have a brand that sets you apart from the pack, right? But he can also kind of hit you and put you in a corner if you’re not careful. So I reserve the right to stretch it and extend it as much as I can.

But I feel very lucky that the word paintings are now part of our culture and that they can have many different contexts in many different roles. They can be from very expensive works of art in an art gallery, to a very affordable puzzle that you can buy online.

You’ve exhibited at Cheekwood, Zeitgeist, and the Country Music Hall of Fame before, but what about your more important connections to Nashville?

Well, I love Nashville. I’ve lived in Nashville since 1975. When I started school at MTSU in Murfreesboro, Nashville was definitely a great destination for us all the time. The big city. So I spent four years at MTSU in Nashville the entire time. I made a lot of friends there. And then when I graduated I moved to Nashville, lived here for a year in 1984. And yes, I love country music. I love old country music.

Nashville is my favorite city in so many ways. It was there that I started to become an artist. It was there that I first met other artists who were going to MTSU or living in Nashville. One of my favorite artists, Bill Killebrew, still paints there in Nashville. He was the first very good professional artist I ever met. So I had all these early origins in Nashville as an artist. This is where I really started to connect with the bigger outside world, and it was my starting point for New York. It was the first real taste of culture I had – Chattanooga wasn’t like that back then. And so I have a very deep connection to Nashville that has lasted since 1975, and some of my best friends still live there. Nashville is also where I started my television career in 1985 when I did the children’s show for WDCN-Channel 8, Mrs. Cabobble’s van. It was my first professional job as a scenographer and puppeteer. And I took this wallet back to New York, and Mrs. Cabobble’s van that’s how I got the Pee-wee’s playhouse job. So Nashville has been a great place to grow and learn as an artist, and to have my confidence to go into the bigger world. It really fed me.

You say you find people identify the word paints as the Wayne White brand. How has this been a change for you, given your early career when you were best known for your work on Pee-wee’s playhouse or other television projects?

I will always be linked to Pee-wee’s playhouse and various other projects that I did on television, and I’m very proud of them. I’m not running away from it. But I was glad I was given the chance, and I’m glad I managed to find my own name and identity, and not just someone who makes someone else look good, you see ? Pee-wee’s playhouse was one of the greatest things that happened to me as an artist. It’s a pleasure and a privilege to work in something that was so important in our culture, that had such positive magic. You know, it’s very rare. Very rare. And I’m glad I caught this ride.

When you were doing your tour which ended up being filmed for the 2012 documentary Beauty is embarrassing, you were also making music during your show.

A little yes. I played a little banjo during my lectures, but I didn’t do anything like what I’m going to try at Julia Martin’s this weekend.

Is this the first musical performance you do in Nashville?

Yes, this is my first performance with a small band in Nashville. And boy, I ask. Come on man! Are you going to Nashville to show off your mediocre musical talent? Please!

It sounds like fun to me.

I will be playing a three string guitar in this project. It’s a group called Username Password, and we got together online during COVID – it was pretty much a quarantine group. I’ve been playing the same cigar box electric guitar for a while. Someone gave it to me as a gift at one of my conferences, actually. I put my banjo down to sign books, and this guy stood in line and gave me this guitar. And so it was in 2013 or 2014, and I got interested in playing it, and I post little videos on social media every now and then. I play with my friends in Chattanooga – Bob Stagner is a drummer and Jim Tate, who is a bass player. I asked them if they would like to put songs on some of the recordings I made, and they did. And so we started this remote collaboration last year, and it was a fun thing to do while we were all locked up. And so I just do my guitar tracks and send them, then they add their parts, then we show the composite video. And we never really played live together. Never. So this will be our debut.

I Suppose that by remaking music your instinct for creativity pays big in terms of just hunching over something and then following it where it leads?

Yes. I mean, these musical things that I do are just really little sketches. They last less than a minute. And there is no pressure to be professional, or to make money or anything like that. It’s just pure play. This is how I can play without any conditions. I’m not a musician, but I have a few musical ideas that I like to play with, and I like to be brief. You know, we’re like this short-lived social media group, this midlife group. I’m not sure how to label it, but it’s really fun for me. And as long as I don’t take it too seriously, I have a lot of fun with it. And I’m really lucky to have real musicians, real working musicians like Jim and Bob, who take me seriously enough to support me and make me sound even better.


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Newton’s “astute pianos” brought together artists and musicians https://akademija-art.net/newtons-astute-pianos-brought-together-artists-and-musicians/ https://akademija-art.net/newtons-astute-pianos-brought-together-artists-and-musicians/#respond Wed, 06 Oct 2021 21:34:07 +0000 https://akademija-art.net/newtons-astute-pianos-brought-together-artists-and-musicians/ Gavris said Newton Community Pride has turned to more visual arts than performance arts during the pandemic, so bringing the Artful Piano Project back this year seemed like a good option. “One of the key parts of our mission is to bring art directly to where people are and create more foot traffic for our […]]]>

Gavris said Newton Community Pride has turned to more visual arts than performance arts during the pandemic, so bringing the Artful Piano Project back this year seemed like a good option.

“One of the key parts of our mission is to bring art directly to where people are and create more foot traffic for our small businesses that have been put to the test during COVID-19,” said said Gavris. “We thought it was a great opportunity to marry two parts of our mission.”

Newton Community Pride commissioned local artists from the community in mid-July to paint the nine pianos for six weeks.

The artwork on the pianos ranged from swimming jellyfish to wide-eyed monsters to swarms of butterflies, all unique to each artist.

Ocllo Mason, a Natick-based artist who participated in the project, painted a piano at the Newton Center titled “Crimson in Clover”.

Mason said his favorite part of the project was working with other artists.

“It can be isolating, painting on your own in your studio and having no one to talk to,” Mason said. “It was just wonderful as an artist to have other people who are artistic and think art is really fun and cool to do their own thing.”

Abby Zheng, a student artist and student at Newton South High School, painted the piano titled “Mountain Views” at Farlow Park in Newton Corner. Zheng said that art has always been a way of expressing oneself.

“My passion for art started when I was very young,” Zheng said, “mainly from my mother, who was an artist herself.”

Zheng said she always wanted to express her art beyond the canvas itself, and the Newton Community Pride project was a perfect opportunity.

Prior to the Artful Piano project, Zheng had also painted a door for Newton Community Pride’s “Newton Out Doors” public art initiative – “Corner Vending Machine” in Auburndale – and when they asked her to paint a piano, she said she was excited to do it again.

“I decided to approach this piano piece with something that is not the typical Eurocentric piece style like Bob Ross, but something that is related to my culture,” Zheng said.

Zheng said she enjoyed working with other artists and getting their point of view and perspective.

“Because of the pandemic, most of the time I confined myself to my room to paint,” Zheng said. “And so, having this opportunity to paint with other artists, I really saw how different artists see their pieces and how different images relate to different meanings.”

Mason said the artists all supported each other.

“We were coming to check on everyone’s work and provide feedback and encouragement, and it was just wonderful,” she said.

As part of the Artful Piano project, Newton Community Pride recruits “Piano Pal” volunteers in each village who cover the pianos with tarpaulins to protect them from the elements, clean them and take care of them as needed.

Despite these efforts, some pianos did not withstand the bad weather in July well; The humidity and rain made some piano keys and pedals stiff and unusable, Gavris said.

Ultimately, Gavris said, she hopes people enjoyed the artwork on some of the pianos even after they deteriorated.

“Playing music is also part of the arts,” Mason said. “So two of the artistic communities come together and do great things. “

Zheng said she appreciated the opportunity to showcase her works as a young artist.

“As an artist, it makes me really proud because my art is showcased and admired,” Zheng said. “I think for a lot of high school artists this is a very rare opportunity to meet.”

Sage Widder, a high school student from Newton South High School and another student artist on the project, painted the Auburndale Library’s “Drifting” piano with colorful jellyfish. Widder said she appreciated the opportunity, especially as a young artist.

“I think a lot of times, as high school kids, we get the message that art isn’t a real career or that it’s not something we can really pursue or have success with,” said Widder said. “I think this experience has shown me that this is not necessarily true.”

If they can, Newton Community Pride hopes to bring back the Artful Piano project next year so people can enjoy and play the piano again.

“After the pandemic, more than any other time, I think people have become more aware of the importance arts and culture bring to residents,” said Gavris. “Hearing spontaneous play, seeing a pretty piece of art that you wouldn’t normally see shopping or shopping, I think it brings joy on a morning or afternoon.”

Isabelle Durso can be reached at newtonreport@globe.com.



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Meet the Indian visual artist who portrays Goan’s heritage through painting https://akademija-art.net/meet-the-indian-visual-artist-who-portrays-goans-heritage-through-painting/ https://akademija-art.net/meet-the-indian-visual-artist-who-portrays-goans-heritage-through-painting/#respond Wed, 06 Oct 2021 07:57:04 +0000 https://akademija-art.net/meet-the-indian-visual-artist-who-portrays-goans-heritage-through-painting/ Clarice Vaz is an Indian visual artist, who runs her own artwork website. She is one of the best painters in Goa, specializing in syringe painting, fluid painting, spin painting, and abstract art. Originally from Saligao, Goa, Clarice loves experimenting with colors, textures, gels and mediums, in addition to getting my hands dirty! She paints […]]]>

Clarice Vaz is an Indian visual artist, who runs her own artwork website. She is one of the best painters in Goa, specializing in syringe painting, fluid painting, spin painting, and abstract art. Originally from Saligao, Goa, Clarice loves experimenting with colors, textures, gels and mediums, in addition to getting my hands dirty! She paints with non-traditional tools. She never follows any artist’s rule book as she believes that art can emerge from almost anything.

ItsGoa team caught up with her and put her in the spotlight.
Humans of Goa is our original and official series that shares inspiring stories from the life of Goan. Humans of Goa is made for and composed of Goans.

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If someone asked you, “What do you do for a living, what would you say?”

I am a housewife who enjoys painting, creating visual stories, and serving.


What was that moment when you decided that “this is it!” I want to become a good Indian visual artist ”?

When I saw our Goan heritage change after decades of Liberation during home visits as a nurse in the 90s, I decided to document everything with pen on paper and brush on canvas.

Image credit – Clarice Vaz

A little about your models. The people you admire when you paint?

I am original in my work and paint with my soul. I have mentors and friends who guide me but I have no role model because I like to make my own way. It’s easier than following someone and being in competition.

artist-life story
Image credit – Clarice Vaz

Any inspiring moment you remember in your life that changed everything …

Yes, the tragic death of my 20 year old eldest son suddenly in his sleep from a rare, life changing, undiagnosed heart disease and I do everything in his memory therefore I do not miss him.

visual-artist-interview
Image credit – Clarice Vaz

What was the biggest challenge in pursuing this full-time career? And how did you overcome it?

I paint, write or photograph because I love to do it. And so, every day, I wake up doing what I love. I don’t work for money because my family takes good care of me. My full-time career was simply a hobby that turned into a cathartic journey and once I got professional recognition I started to compete with myself using my talents to help others in memory of my deceased son.

I paint, write or photograph because I love to do it. And so, every day, I wake up doing what I love. I don’t work for money because my family takes good care of me. My full-time career was simply a hobby that turned into a cathartic journey and once I got professional recognition I started to compete with myself using my talents to help others in memory of my deceased son.

The luxury I have is that my career is a HOBBY! That’s why I like “challenges” and don’t be afraid.

best-paintings-of-india
Image credit – Clarice Vaz

Childhood memories you would like to share? Something that sparked the love for painting?

I’ve always loved to draw but I’ve been told that ‘Artists don’t survive. You need a skill in hand ‘! So I chose to become a nurse instead because at that time Mother Teresa was my inspiration. I studied at St. Martha’s College of Nursing in Bangalore and worked there and briefly in Mumbai before becoming a full time mother to my young boys by choice. I only started painting and writing visual stories when they came out of Goa to continue their education. Later I started to paint especially in memory of my son Craig Vaz so that I could use the profits for my social work in his memory.

best-goan-artist
Image credit – Claric Vaz

Who is the person you would like to meet from the past? And what would you ask him?

I would like to meet my little self and I would like to say that life was not that hard after all. I am almost 57 years old today and have witnessed some bittersweet moments. Knowing who we are is fundamental in life and this is what I would like to tell everyone because it is NEVER taught to us anywhere at school, home, church or work. They tell us what to do and how to do but no one tells us who we are! How worthy, whole and loved we are already! From there, we can do anything!

Indian-painter-interview
Image credit – Clarice Vaz

If you could turn back time, what would you say to your young self?

I would teach and train my young self to claim its worth. I don’t want to be the best Indian visual artist, I just want to tell stories to the best of my ability.

indian-visual-designer
Image credit – Clarice Vaz

Can you write us a few lines here on the theme of “Life is art”?

If you can accept that every time you think a thought and say a word you are creating your reality, you are painting your future, you are creating your own life. The choice of colors on the easel of your soul is important. It’s a full time job! I am also aware of the colors with which I would not like to paint. I like that a lot of people like the painting of my life, my actions, my personality, what I believe, what I feel. It’s nice.

indian-artist
Image credit – Clarice Vaz

What role have family and friends played? A quick incident that you remember when your family or friends helped you overcome an obstacle or a challenge in life?

It was a big challenge when my family found out that I was a creative person. They had never seen this side of me. Creativity takes long hours of work and as my successes have started to show, they have accepted the fact that I was indeed gifted with a little talent and today I can freely do what I love. they support me

Indian top painter
Image credit – Clarice Vaz

What was the feedback from people (negative and positive) and who supported you the most?

Honestly, I don’t consider people’s opinions but I listen to them. Ultimately, art is self-expression and it’s something so inclusive that after all, art only resides in the eyes of the beholder!
I have an honest mentor / friend who took a look at my work in 2014 and immediately knew I was talented. Having been trained at Sir JJ School of Art, her belief in my work changed my perspective on LIFE and as a nurse, I became a full time painter only to experiment with the tools of my trade, that of using a syringe for painting! She encouraged me all along.
She is a senior art director / graphic designer having worked for large companies like FCB Speer, DDB Mudra, Ogilvy, Walt Disney and more. A humble and simple soul, who has simply walked around my house to check on my work. She bought my first work of art as a professional. Her name is Bina Nayak. She has also been part of my visual story books as an editor and designer.

goa-best-artist-interview
Image credit – Clarice Vaz

What legacy do you want to leave? And for whom?

I am just a soul traveling through life. A little of the big Whole. My actions will be my inheritance. To be an admired Indian visual artist fills me with pride.

goan-famous-personalities
Image credit – Clarice Vaz

You can view an excerpt from this conversation on ItsGoa’s Instagram page https://www.instagram.com/p/CUrQAwkDdsA/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link. Humans of Goa is our original and official series that shares stories from the life of Goan. “Humans of Goa” celebrates the spirit of every Goan.

Use #humansofgoa to feature your story and follow ItsGoa for more inspiring stories.



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Building an artistic community in India through zines https://akademija-art.net/building-an-artistic-community-in-india-through-zines/ https://akademija-art.net/building-an-artistic-community-in-india-through-zines/#respond Tue, 05 Oct 2021 20:32:00 +0000 https://akademija-art.net/building-an-artistic-community-in-india-through-zines/ When the COVID-19 pandemic caused the world to go digital in 2020, a small team of artists, writers and curators in New Delhi, India, began working on a dream project, driven by the joy of printing. Irregular times (TITLE), India’s premier art and design journal, attempts to cultivate a community culture around design and zine […]]]>


When the COVID-19 pandemic caused the world to go digital in 2020, a small team of artists, writers and curators in New Delhi, India, began working on a dream project, driven by the joy of printing. Irregular times (TITLE), India’s premier art and design journal, attempts to cultivate a community culture around design and zine making while creating a platform to share fresh and interesting voices from the country on a quarterly basis.

This DIY project spanning 52 pages of art, writing, photography, architecture, food and interactive media was designed after the success of the 2018 and 2019 editions of Irregulars Art Fair, the world’s first ‘anti -art ”from India. In February 2020, the third edition of the fair was postponed due to Citizenship Amendment Act protests across India, followed by the pandemic.

“While it was calming and calming not to participate in another nerve-wracking physical event, we felt that as an entity that thrived solely on community-driven art endeavors, we would start to lose value. relevance. In the midst of the pandemic, everything experiential had already started moving online, and by the end of 2020 there was a certain level of angst and exhaustion surrounding these online experiences. We couldn’t bring ourselves to work on an online production, ”recalls Anant Ahuja, editor of TITLE.

Irregular times spread page

After several discussions with Tarini Sethi, editorial director of TITLE and co-founder of the Irregulars art fair, the two decided to combine Sethi’s love for analogue printing with Ahuja’s obsession with newsprint, and experiment with the newspaper format. “It was simple: if people can’t come to our events and experience art physically, let’s bring them the art,” says Ahuja.

Their early market research through surveys and discussions with those who still pursue print publishing gave them the courage to launch the newspaper, which has already sold over 1,000 copies and more. The first issue, Please wait for the host to start this meeting, explores the impact of digital addiction in our recent lives. From an essay on rewilding in India by environmentalist Cara Tejpal to dystopian imagery by visual artist Anpu Varkey, to a deep dive into the artistic practice of Chiraag Bhakta, the journal features a variety of interesting voices. .

TITLEThe first successes show that the print is alive and well. “Printing is definitely not dead and proving that this is something that is really important to us,” Sethi shares. “I ran a zine collective with a friend called Working time collective for years and have a lot of experience in zine making and its history. All of my work as an artist is also completely analog in nature, so personally I really prefer things to be printed. Anant has also produced numerous zines and designed print publications and we both understand how vital it is to be able to experience art in person.

Irregular times spread page

For the managing editor, the newspaper is an extension of the art fair. “We exist primarily to give artists a platform to showcase their work while educating them and showing them that something like this can be done by anyone,” she explains, adding: “With TITLE, we wanted to experiment with new ideas and make sure that this platform was not just for the artist community, but had a broader reach and was both accessible and understandable for a community. more diverse. “

TIRT is a labor of love, with additions like a DIY zine insert, a categorized column for jobs in the creative sector, and Sheena Maria Piedade’s “Ask a Friend” advice column. Discussing the ideation and curation process, Sethi says they wanted to bring back an element of surprise in the form of columns and activities that old Indian publications had, while also making it as interactive as possible. “We wanted people to WANT to keep the journal and come back to it whenever they were looking for inspiration, ideas or just to learn something,” she explains.

Irregular times spread page

“The ‘Announcements’ column makes sense because the resources for artists and creatives are so limited in India and it is so important to have a community of people to talk to and learn from. The DIY zine insert is because we want people to be able to learn a new trade in each issue. We encourage our readers to cut out the page, fold it, and go really crazy. Likewise, we have an adult coloring page, “Anonymous Adults”, to get people used to the idea of ​​“sex” without having to really talk about it. Sheena’s “Asking for a Friend” column was another one we knew we had to have. It takes us back to our childhood, where we read columns of advice in Cosmos review or Today’s teens. “

The creators collaborated with Mumbai-based design studio BunxPav to create the visual identity and design language for the first edition. “Mayur and Yadna from BunxPav brought a strong sense of typography, grids, structure and design layouts to the table. Since the journal had so many different features, articles, and interactive elements, it was imperative that we have a design language that gives us enough leverage to experiment and break the rules, while still tying the set together. publication, ”Ahuja notes.

Both say one of the biggest challenges was completing the diary during the lockdown and in the midst of so much pain and loss. “We had a limited number of paper options because most of the paper stores in Delhi were closed, [and] we had to postpone the work with two artists that we had announced, due to losses in their families, and had to suspend our screen printing partnership with Pulp Society because their entire team was locked up, ”Sethi shares.

Irregular times spread page

But these early setbacks only prompted them to redouble their efforts and take stock of what they have learned to produce future editions that are even more innovative. Ahuja says, “We were constantly excited about the next issue and I think that’s probably how we knew we were there for the long haul. Instead of making mistakes and feeling down, we knew we had learned from them and could use them to make the next issue even better.

According to Seti, Irregular times will be released quarterly until it becomes more financially viable. “Until then, we want to push the boundaries in the art and design space, collaborate with interesting people from India and beyond, and just create a culture around print media and the creation of Zine.”

Irregular times is available for reading online or in print.

In five locations in Antwerp, the ModeMuseum shows how the delicate canvas-shaped fabric has become a staple in art, craft, fashion and commerce.


The exhibition includes paintings by Thomas Cole and Frederic Church, as well as contemporary works focused on habitat protection and environmental sustainability.


This update brings the star power of Jessica Chastain and Oscar Isaac, but can’t match the emotional intensity of the original.





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SBCC Jazz Bands To Perform With Grammy Award-Winning Artist – The Channels https://akademija-art.net/sbcc-jazz-bands-to-perform-with-grammy-award-winning-artist-the-channels/ https://akademija-art.net/sbcc-jazz-bands-to-perform-with-grammy-award-winning-artist-the-channels/#respond Tue, 05 Oct 2021 00:14:06 +0000 https://akademija-art.net/sbcc-jazz-bands-to-perform-with-grammy-award-winning-artist-the-channels/ City College’s New World Jazz Ensemble will perform original pieces alongside Grammy-winning artist Ted Nash. Nash, of the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra and one of the world’s greatest woodwind players, is in a program with students from the Santa Barbara Museum of Art and City College. The program is part of a six-week workshop he […]]]>

City College’s New World Jazz Ensemble will perform original pieces alongside Grammy-winning artist Ted Nash.

Nash, of the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra and one of the world’s greatest woodwind players, is in a program with students from the Santa Barbara Museum of Art and City College. The program is part of a six-week workshop he gives with music majors. This is a unique opportunity for students to work closely with a winner of multiple Grammy.

“We work with Ted Nash who is the main woodwind instrumentalist of the Lincoln Center Jazz OrchestraSaid Jim Mooy, conductor of the City College Symphony Orchestra and conductor of the Lunch Break Jazz Ensemble.

The students were tasked with composing jazz songs, each inspired by different works of art.

Nine years ago, Nash wrote a Grammy nominated play titled “Portrait in Seven Shades. “The composition was inspired by famous paintings by artists featuring Marc Chagall, Salvador Dalí, Henri Matisse, Pablo Picasso, Jackson Pollock, Vincent van Gogh and Claude Monet. Its suite consists of seven movements, each inspired by the acclaimed artists, he described his impressions of each work of art and performed the corresponding musical composition it inspired.

Nash uses the same process to guide the students, going to the Santa Barbara Art Museum and being inspired by the pieces there. Using this creative process, students reflect on the artist’s creative process to create their art while attempting to interpret it in rich compositions.

Nash worked directly with the students each week, offering feedback and suggestions as the students composed music for the 10-piece jazz ensemble.

“I am incredibly honored,” group member Jezreel Real said of his collaboration with Nash. “I compose a lot of music and it’s really cool to have my stuff professionally watched.”

The students chose a board to write a piece of music. Over the next five weeks, the students developed their songs and ideas to begin putting on a concert featuring their original music inspired by the visual arts.

“We put everything in place, the SBCC connection with the art museum connection,” Mooy said. “And now our students can participate in this museum co-sponsored event.”

The concert will take place at 2:30 p.m. on Saturday, October 9 on the front terrace of the Santa Barbara Museum of Art. The event will be free with tickets available on the museum site website.


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New art exhibition at Middle East Institute challenges Arab-American representation https://akademija-art.net/new-art-exhibition-at-middle-east-institute-challenges-arab-american-representation/ https://akademija-art.net/new-art-exhibition-at-middle-east-institute-challenges-arab-american-representation/#respond Mon, 04 Oct 2021 04:21:42 +0000 https://akademija-art.net/new-art-exhibition-at-middle-east-institute-challenges-arab-american-representation/ The Middle East Institute’s new exhibition in Washington, DC asks a simple question: Why has Arab-American art received so little recognition in the United States? “If you look at the various ethnic communities in the United States whose artistic scenes have made significant progress over the past 20 years, we would think of the Asian […]]]>

The Middle East Institute’s new exhibition in Washington, DC asks a simple question: Why has Arab-American art received so little recognition in the United States?

“If you look at the various ethnic communities in the United States whose artistic scenes have made significant progress over the past 20 years, we would think of the Asian American community, the Chicano community, or the black community,” explains Maymanah Farhat, curator of Converging Lines: Tracing the Artistic Lineage of the Arab Diaspora in the United States.

“It’s wonderful, in terms of additional inclusion and historicization. But the Arab-American arts community is still uncharted territory in the larger American narrative. “

While these groups had clear centers of activity, like Chicago among black artists or Los Angeles among the Chicano community, Arab-American artists have scattered across the country, to San Francisco, Los Angeles, Dearborn, Chicago. , New York, Washington. , DC and elsewhere. They did not merge into a singular movement, which makes it difficult to draw credible contours around Arab-American art.

Instead of seeking an Arab-American “style”, Farhat emphasizes the American context in which the Arab-American artists worked. It’s a shrewd appreciation of how the reception of work can dominate the way it is viewed. The tendency to portray Arab-American artists as Arabs rather than a hybrid community prevents these artists from being part of American history – and keeps them in an Arab identity that tends to be politically colorful.

“We are made either very visible in terms of political positioning and profiling, but also very invisible in terms of our cultural contributions,” says Farhat, who grew up in California and has a Lebanese father.

“Arabs in America are really touched by the political rhetoric of the time. September 11th was a watershed moment for many of us because we were struck by profiling and hyper visibility. And before that, in the 1990s shows that took place with Arab-American female artists, a lot revolved around the idea of ​​the veil and those very orientalist tropes – which the artists themselves didn’t care about.

The exhibition begins with a carefully drawn study of a face, which is part of a book project by Kahlil Gibran, the Lebanese poet and artist who lived in Boston in the early 1900s. Gibran’s inclusion underscores the longevity of the Arab-American community in the United States; in his famous letter to young Syrians from 1926, he evokes the pride of belonging both to the region that produced Damascus and Byblos and of being part of the new American civilization.

This mixed identity constitutes the leitmotif of the show, which progresses generationally through its 17 artists. Two serigraphs by the late Palestinian artist Kamal Boullata, exiled in 1967, are examples of his luminous, colorful and mathematically rigorous calligraphy.

His work is widely regarded for its innovations in this area or, as at a 2020 lecture at the University of Cambridge, how it fits into the tradition of Arabic bookmaking (dafatir) and the easy crossing between poetry and art that is common. in Arabic art.

Converging Lines works recognize these themes while drawing its American context.

“Kamal Boullata lived in Washington, DC from the 1960s to the 1990s,” says Farhat. “He is very imbued with the Washington school of colors. He did his MFA at the Corcoran School of Art, and you can easily see the dynamism of Alma Thomas, Gene Davis, Kenneth Noland in his work. But then he also created some very Islamic works, and he was very proud of his own personal cultural history of being from Jerusalem, and all the magnificence that that means.

Likewise, for Lebanese artist Huguette Caland who worked in Los Angeles from 1987 to 2013, Farhat points to the influence of West Coast artists such as James Turrell and Ed Moses. Turrell’s attempt, for example, to capture the mellow California air has clear parallels to Caland’s extraordinary ability to render light and color three-dimensional, curved, and ready to hold.

Other artists in the exhibition combine American and Arab references to represent their dual belonging, a complex of emotions familiar to all immigrant families.

Iraqi artist Nazar Yahya, now living in Houston, painted the diptych Tribute to Twombly (2012) with streaky drops descending on the canvas from stunning flower-like shards reminiscent of Cy Twombly Pink series from the late 2000s.

Behind the colored washes hides the image of an Iraqi woman, who appears both present in an imposing way but also erased by the colors exhibited.

Chicago-born artist Yasmine Nasser Diaz has made a series of collages based on her experience visiting her family in Yemen in the 1980s, mixing both images of Old Sana’a with other interests. of the time for a 15-year-old, like Salt-N-Pepa and Madonna.

There is a slight irony in the fact that the Middle East Institute emphasizes the American character of these artists, but the result is a greatly enriched understanding of their work. And by acknowledging the context in which these artists appeared, the show also addresses the quirky and even artificial way in which they entered the mainstream of the art world.

Farhat notes, for example, how Caland and Etel Adnan were partly received as hitherto unknown Arab artists in their recent exhibitions in Western institutions. A 2015 review of Caland’s work in the magazine frieze, for example, called the artist’s work, then 83, a “welcome revelation.” But these artists had been known for decades to both the Arab community and the American artists they worked among. But, says Farhat, they just lacked lawyers.

“There aren’t a lot of conservatives. There aren’t many art historians, ”she says. “When you don’t have this level of institutional support, and you don’t have this push from the market, institutions, activists, academics, it’s hard to move forward.

“The Arab-American literary scene has taken off over the past 10 to 15 years, and it is not uncommon now to see Arab-American writers participating in literary festivals in Brooklyn or Los Angeles. But visual artists, we just haven’t had the same kind of support.

This is Farhat’s second exhibition for MEI, a think tank that has opened an art gallery on the ground floor as part of its cultural programming. She is not at the center of the art world and one wonders how far this criticism will go beyond those who are already grappling with her concerns.

But the gallery’s programming so far – such as an exhibition of protest photographs in Beirut and an indispensable look at contemporary Syrian art, curated by Farhat – has filled an important gap in the American institutional landscape and made of the site an important, albeit unexpected, site. source of both advocacy and sensitive analysis.

Converging Lines: Tracing the Artistic Lineage of the Arab Diaspora in the US is at the MEI Art Gallery until Wednesday November 17, 2021

Update: October 4, 2021, 4:18 a.m.


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At 30, the Carr Center aims to “transmit African-American culture to the world” https://akademija-art.net/at-30-the-carr-center-aims-to-transmit-african-american-culture-to-the-world/ https://akademija-art.net/at-30-the-carr-center-aims-to-transmit-african-american-culture-to-the-world/#respond Sun, 03 Oct 2021 11:01:22 +0000 https://akademija-art.net/at-30-the-carr-center-aims-to-transmit-african-american-culture-to-the-world/ Carr Center workers were studying their new dig in Midtown Detroit when they had an “accident by divine order,” as director Oliver Ragsdale put it. At Park Shelton on Woodward, the longtime black arts organization had secured a former retail space to renovate into a live performance studio. It was then that someone looked up […]]]>

Carr Center workers were studying their new dig in Midtown Detroit when they had an “accident by divine order,” as director Oliver Ragsdale put it.

At Park Shelton on Woodward, the longtime black arts organization had secured a former retail space to renovate into a live performance studio. It was then that someone looked up and saw an ornate plasterwork above the current suspended ceiling.

The tiles were removed, old architectural drawings were obtained, and the Carr Center discovered they had a gem in their hands: The room wasn’t just an abandoned retail space – it was the room. 1926 Park Shelton Hotel’s original ballroom.

“Suddenly 1,100 square feet became 2,500 square feet,” said Ragsdale, general manager and program director. “When you see the space, it’s pretty mind-boggling.”


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Foundations: ‘Make / Mark’ Leads Third Annual Exhibition | Local News https://akademija-art.net/foundations-make-mark-leads-third-annual-exhibition-local-news/ https://akademija-art.net/foundations-make-mark-leads-third-annual-exhibition-local-news/#respond Sat, 02 Oct 2021 17:00:00 +0000 https://akademija-art.net/foundations-make-mark-leads-third-annual-exhibition-local-news/ VALDOSTA – The annual Foundations Exhibition becomes another tradition for the Art & Design exhibition season at Valdosta State University. For the third year, the show highlights exemplary works by VSU art students. “The Foundations exhibit features exemplary student artwork created as part of the Foundations Zone classes,” according to a statement from VSU Art. […]]]>

VALDOSTA – The annual Foundations Exhibition becomes another tradition for the Art & Design exhibition season at Valdosta State University.

For the third year, the show highlights exemplary works by VSU art students.

“The Foundations exhibit features exemplary student artwork created as part of the Foundations Zone classes,” according to a statement from VSU Art. “This exhibition presents first-year students the honor of departmental recognition within the Art & Design department.

“Additionally, the exhibit provides students, faculty, and guests with a way to understand the objectives of each course and the learning outcomes for each exposed task.”

The exhibited work is taken from the works of the old art classes of VSU: drawing I (ART 1010), drawing II (ART 1011), 2D design (ART 1020), 3D design (ART 1030), computers in art ( ART 2030). Classes and Students Taught by VSU Art Faculty: Foundations Faculty Represented: Julie Bowland, Evelyn Davis-Walker, Clyde Edwards, Mark Errol, Craig Hawkins, Abigail Heuss, Selena Nawrocki, Taylor Shaw, Kaleena Stasiak.

“The Foundations program encourages understanding and application of the basics of design, creative and analytical thinking, and problem solving,” the statement said. “The core courses, which all Art & Design majors take in their first two years, are essential for pursuing a visual arts program.”

Foundation exhibitions provide another opportunity for VSU art students to exhibit their work.

“Make / Mark: Third Annual Foundations Art Exhibition” opens 6 to 7:30 p.m. on Monday, October 4, with a free public reception, Dedo Maranville Fine Arts Gallery, Valdosta State University Fine Arts Building, corner of Brookwood and North Oak; for health reasons, no refreshments will be served at the reception. The exhibition runs until November 5. Gallery opening hours: 11:35 a.m. to 4:45 p.m., 5 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays; 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday; noon-3 p.m. Friday.


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DJ Mo Laudi | “Salon Globalisto” – Flaunt Magazine https://akademija-art.net/dj-mo-laudi-salon-globalisto-flaunt-magazine/ https://akademija-art.net/dj-mo-laudi-salon-globalisto-flaunt-magazine/#respond Fri, 01 Oct 2021 22:36:18 +0000 https://akademija-art.net/dj-mo-laudi-salon-globalisto-flaunt-magazine/ Combining visual art and music, DJ Mo Laudi inaugurated his very first art exhibition at the Galerie Bonne Espérance in Paris, entitled Globalisto Fair. The exhibition, which ran from June 17 to September 30, featured works that celebrate South African artists, on the mark with the goal of the gallery that hosted the exhibition, which […]]]>

Combining visual art and music, DJ Mo Laudi inaugurated his very first art exhibition at the Galerie Bonne Espérance in Paris, entitled Globalisto Fair.

The exhibition, which ran from June 17 to September 30, featured works that celebrate South African artists, on the mark with the goal of the gallery that hosted the exhibition, which is to showcase South African culture. Salon Globalisto seeks to do the same; South African DJ Mo Laudi not only curated artwork by various artists from his country, but also showcased his own art every Sunday at the exhibition.

Title, A conversation with Gérard Sekoto, the performance features the voice of the late South African painter and musician Gerard Sekoto, combined with the ‘meditative oriental crystal sounds of DJ Mo Laudi with arpeggiators referring to techno music’. Sekoto’s songs, often inspired by traditional spirituals, came out in the late 1950s and are intimate reflections of black culture, tackling topics such as protest, struggle and slavery.

Laudi wanted to use the music and art of Sekoto because, while the painter is widely recognized in South Africa for his talent, he is rarely represented on the French art scene, although the artist lived and worked in Paris. from 1947 until his death in 1993.

On Saturday October 2, DJ Mo Laudi will perform in Paris during the celebration of the Magic Issue of Flaunt, now available.


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