Visual Art – Akademija Art http://akademija-art.net/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 14:19:35 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://akademija-art.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-150x150.png Visual Art – Akademija Art http://akademija-art.net/ 32 32 Visual arts students learn to weld sculptures https://akademija-art.net/visual-arts-students-learn-to-weld-sculptures/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 14:02:15 +0000 https://akademija-art.net/visual-arts-students-learn-to-weld-sculptures/ “The LEAP grant has given me and my students the tools we need to create great works of public art,” Repko said. “And now we have a new space on the Gainesville campus to build these pieces. Our students can produce art that can withstand the elements, which will take the public art initiative further.” […]]]>

“The LEAP grant has given me and my students the tools we need to create great works of public art,” Repko said. “And now we have a new space on the Gainesville campus to build these pieces. Our students can produce art that can withstand the elements, which will take the public art initiative further.”

Repko’s ultimate goal is to have students design and build large sculptures to revolve around the housing authority communities and UNG campuses.

“We can make the experience valuable for students and give back to the community,” Repko said.

Alexandra Sorto, a senior pursuing a degree in art marketing, was just thrilled to use the welding machine properly.

“The goal is to heat up the metal you’re touching and make it look like pearls,” the Sugar Hill, Georgia resident said. “It’s almost like using a glorified glue gun. Beads are the norm.”

Sorto said one of his welds looked good but the other didn’t look appealing. Alvarez admitted his first weld turned out to be sloppy, but it pushed him to work harder. The Lawrenceville, Georgia resident aspires to make a living as a carver, especially given his family’s background.

“My grandmother was a metalworker. She had her own metal shop,” Alvarez said. “Using the welder makes me feel close to her, now that she’s passed away.”

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Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts at the University of Washington Announces 2022 Distinction Awards | News https://akademija-art.net/sam-fox-school-of-design-visual-arts-at-the-university-of-washington-announces-2022-distinction-awards-news/ Wed, 12 Jan 2022 18:31:39 +0000 https://akademija-art.net/sam-fox-school-of-design-visual-arts-at-the-university-of-washington-announces-2022-distinction-awards-news/ anchor Weil Hall by Kieran Timberlake. Image: James Ewing Photography / Kieran Timberlake The Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts at Washington University in St. Louis announced the recipients of its 2022 Awards of Distinction. The annual program recognizes alumni of the school who are leaders in their fields and who have demonstrated […]]]>
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Weil Hall by Kieran Timberlake. Image: James Ewing Photography / Kieran Timberlake

The Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts at Washington University in St. Louis announced the recipients of its 2022 Awards of Distinction.

The annual program recognizes alumni of the school who are leaders in their fields and who have demonstrated professional achievement in the fields of architecture, art and design, as well as service to their profession. , to the community or to the Sam Fox School and the University of Washington.

Philadelphia-based architecture firm Kieran Timberlake will receive the school’s highest honor, the Dean’s Medal, which honors individuals or groups whose contributions have elevated the fields of art, architecture and design. Kieran Timberlake is being recognized for his work on the University of Washington’s East End transformation, a reimagining of the East End of the school’s Danforth campus, which included Weil Hall, the new art and architecture building at the Sam Fox School. Five of the project’s eight major components were designed by KieranTimberlake and completed in 2019.

The following eight Sam Fox School alumni will also be recognized:

Excellence Award

Andrew Bernheimer, FAIA, March 94

Jill Downen, MFA01, Nicholas Kahn, BFA86, and Richard Selesnick, BFA86

Kate Dundes Shattan, BA77

Recent Alumni Awards

Adam Hogan, PhD, MFA14

Frank Lin, March 2006, and Megan Harris Lin, March 2006

Recipients will be honored at the annual Distinction Awards ceremony on April 21.


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The punk Marie-Antoinette of the New York art scene of the 1970s https://akademija-art.net/the-punk-marie-antoinette-of-the-new-york-art-scene-of-the-1970s/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 22:06:00 +0000 https://akademija-art.net/the-punk-marie-antoinette-of-the-new-york-art-scene-of-the-1970s/ Although she symbolically died of a staple cut at the Whitney Museum in 1978, Colette is alive and well. Resurrected a few days later as Justine, lead singer of a newly formed group, Justine and the Victorian Punks (a collaboration with Peter Gordon’s Love of Life Orchestra), Colette recalls in a 2013 BOMB magazine interview […]]]>

Although she symbolically died of a staple cut at the Whitney Museum in 1978, Colette is alive and well. Resurrected a few days later as Justine, lead singer of a newly formed group, Justine and the Victorian Punks (a collaboration with Peter Gordon’s Love of Life Orchestra), Colette recalls in a 2013 BOMB magazine interview with Katie Peyton that her performative death was a critique of artists often having to wait until their deaths to be recognized (which is particularly the case for women). And indeed, it is an indisputable fact that the Franco-Tunisian Colette Lumière is a seriously unrecognized artist, whose lasting importance on visual culture and the practice of performance has not yet been fully understood by the world of art. Prior to moving to Berlin in 1984, Colette was a prolific artistic personality immersed in the New York art scene of the 1970s, a punk Marie-Antoinette with a childish voice and fashion outfits. Working across a variety of media, while always emphasizing the performance of identity, her designs ranged from frilly dresses and punk T-shirts to sculptural installations, light boxes and shorts.

Colette Lumière, “Untitled” (nd), archival material

Before Tilda Swinton slept in the glass box Cornelia Parker built at MoMA, Colette incorporated sleep as an endurance practice into several of her performances. Between 1972 and 1983, the artist created a gesamtkunstwerk by transforming her downtown loft into what she called a ‘living environment’, an immersive installation in which she herself is activated as a living sculpture. The current exhibition at the Company gallery, Notes on baroque life: Colette and her living environment, 1972-1983, curated by Kenta Murakami, takes the latter as its foundation. Entering Colette’s reconstituted living environment means entering a dreamlike world saturated with a palette of creams and light roses. Fragments of walls, light boxes, sculptures, clothing and objects, as well as footage from films and framed postcards, are spread throughout the gallery. In Colette’s world, the theatricality of Versailles meets the punk ethic of the Sex Pistols, and the silky ruched fabric is a signature material you can’t get too much of. The likeness of the artist is omnipresent; photographs are incorporated into most parts, and his image is featured in performance announcements and literature. A large sculptural installation entitled Notes of baroque life (1978-1983 / 2021), reconstructed from original elements of her living environment, centers a life-size doll sculpture by Colette, produced in collaboration with the artist from the Compagnie Cajsa von Zeipel.

For a decade that has seen a preponderance of conceptual art, as well as a nascent generation of images that denounced the notion of authenticity even as artists returned to representation, Colette’s practice is simply radical. Her identity performance, portraying a number of characters in addition to Justine over the years, is combined with a deep dedication to materiality that is rare in performance art, by its nature fleeting form. The “baroque” element referenced in the title does not simply indicate extravagance and taste for dramatic lighting. What Colette shares with the Baroque movement is a brilliant ability to eliminate the border between art and life, between the space of the spectator and that of the work of art, creating a truly immersive environment.

Colette Lumière, “The Messenger” (1978-2021), fabric, photography, lights, plexiglass and mixed media
Colette Lumière, “Beautiful Dreamer Uniform Series II” (1980-84), mixed technique on linen
Colette Lumiere, Baroque life notes (1978-1983 / 2021), panels and ceiling from the original living environment, original lamp in Colette’s size, CRT monitor in Colette’s size, selections from Documents of the story of my life, rugs, mirrors, shelves, perfume bottle, Living Doll sculpture in collaboration with Casja von Zeipel
Colette Lumière, “Off the Wall (Hommage à Paul Delvaux)” (1974), fabric, photography, light and mixed media on wood

Notes on baroque life: Colette and her living environment, 1972-1983 continues at Company (145 Elizabeth Street, Manhattan) through January 22. The exhibition was curated by Kenta Murakami.

Students can register for a full residency in Portland, ME or a low residency from anywhere in the world. Apply by January 21 to be considered for a full scholarship.


The long-term loan could “pave the way for a similar deal with an act of approval by the British Parliament,” said the director of the Acropolis museum.


“Staff have dealt with the most recent vandalism at Indian Head already, but most of the damage is, unfortunately, permanent,” officials at Big Bend State Park in Texas said.


Using magical realism and never taking the expected approach, Georgian director Alexander Koberidze asks viewers to pay more attention to the world around them.


Samantha Platero realized how much of the jewelry presented as “Navajo” was adulterated and inauthentic, and how her community rarely really benefited from this economy.


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Rydell Visual Arts Scholarship Exhibition ━ Times Publishing Group, Inc. https://akademija-art.net/rydell-visual-arts-scholarship-exhibition-%e2%94%81-times-publishing-group-inc/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 00:50:15 +0000 https://akademija-art.net/rydell-visual-arts-scholarship-exhibition-%e2%94%81-times-publishing-group-inc/ Four local visual artists have been selected by the Santa Cruz County Community Foundation to receive the Rydell Visual Arts Fellowship Awards for 2022 and 2023. They are Kristiana Chan, Anna Friz, Kajahl Benes-Trapp and Janette Gross. Each scholarship recipient receives a $ 20,000 scholarship to pursue their artistic career. ••• Kajahl Benes-Trapp was born […]]]>

Four local visual artists have been selected by the Santa Cruz County Community Foundation to receive the Rydell Visual Arts Fellowship Awards for 2022 and 2023.

They are Kristiana Chan, Anna Friz, Kajahl Benes-Trapp and Janette Gross. Each scholarship recipient receives a $ 20,000 scholarship to pursue their artistic career.

•••

Kajahl Benes-Trapp was born in Santa Cruz in 1985 and received his BFA in Painting from San Francisco State University in 2008. He spent his final year studying at the Accademia di Belle Arti di Firenze, Tuscany, Italy. In 2012, Benes-Trapp received his MFA in painting from Hunter College in New York.

Kajahl Benes-Trapp at work

In 2013, he was a recipient of the Joan Mitchell Foundation Painters and Sculptors Grant. He was also artist in residence in 2016 at the Joan Mitchell Center in New Orleans. Most recently, Benes-Trapp received an Artist in Residence at the Lower Eastside Printshop New York in 2019.

Benes-Trapp is represented by the Richard Heller Gallery in Los Angeles and the Monique Meloche Gallery in Chicago. Recent solo exhibitions include Obscure Origins at Tillou Fine Arts Brooklyn, NY, curated by Larry Ossei-Mensah. Entities discovered at the Richard Heller Gallery in Los Angeles.

His latest solo exhibition, Royal Specter, opens at the Monique Meloche Gallery in Chicago, IL. His work is in the public collections of Collection Solo, The Dean Collection and 21c Museum Hotel: Art Museum.

•••

Kristiana chan is a first generation Malaysian-Chinese artist, writer and educator from the Southern United States. Her work examines the physical memory of the landscape and the excluded stories of the displaced Chinese diaspora.

Rydell Times Publishing Group Inc tpgonlinedaily.com

Kristiana chan

It researches the political, historical and environmental heritage of the landscape and its material elements, incorporating their elementary properties into its processes. Working in several disciplines, she uses video installation, archival photography and experimental alternative photographic processes.

More recently, Chan has worked with clay and ceramics collected from the wild. She is deeply fascinated by how the not-so-distant stories of racial exclusion, erasure and extractive environmental capitalism lay the groundwork for every day, live contemporary experiences, and contribute to our simultaneous crises of violent racism and climate catastrophe. .

Uncovering the roots of our origins, his work seeks to revive and account for the stories and lives lost, and their implications for race and the environment, so that by knowing where we came from, we can envision a new future for ourselves.

Chan’s personal exhibitions have taken place at the START Gallery (Winston-Salem) and The Growlery (San Francisco). Group exhibitions include SOMArts, ProArts, Root Division, Kearny Street Workshop, and CTRL + SHFT Collective. Chan’s work has been featured in Lenscratch Magazine, Seawitches Zine, and Thank You For Nothing Zine. She holds a BA from Wake Forest University.

•••

Anna friz creates media art, sound and the art of transmission, working across multiple platforms to present installations, shows, films and performances. His works reflect on media ecologies, land use, infrastructure, the perception of time and critical fictions.

Rydell Times Publishing Group Inc tpgonlinedaily.com

Anna Friz at work

Currently, Friz is focusing on a series of audiovisual works under the title We Build Ruins, which expressly consider the mining and industrial corridors in the high altitude desert in northern Chile.

She has often worked with the Toronto-based collective Public Studio to create multi-channel film installations and sculptures that critically examine the social policies of landscape, environment and urban systems.

Presentations of his work in recent years include Ars Electronica Festival (Linz, Austria), Museum of Arts and Design (New York), SITE Gallery (Houston), The New York Times Magazine, esc Media Kunst Labor (Graz, Austria), ReWire Festival (The Hague, Netherlands), Soundhouse at the Barbican (London), Espace Multimedia Gantner (Belfort France) and RE: SOUND Festival (Aalborg, Denmark).

Friz’s radio works have been heard on airwaves in more than 25 countries and commissioned by national public radio stations from Austria, Australia, Canada, Finland, Germany and Mexico.

Friz holds a PhD from York University in Toronto and is currently an Assistant Professor of Film and Digital Media at UC Santa Cruz.

•••

Janette Gross is a tapestry weaver whose work focuses primarily on wedge weaving, a technique developed by the Diné (Navajo) Nation in the late 19th century. It honors the Diné tradition but uses contemporary designs and techniques.

Rydell Times Publishing Group Inc tpgonlinedaily.com

Janette Gross with her art

Gross dyes most of his woolen yarns with natural dyes, many of which come from local plants. Gross began to study weaving and tapestry techniques after his retirement. His current work focuses on the devastating effects of climate change.

She and a visiting group of local weavers worked for many years in the Watsonville studio of famous carpet weaver, Martha Stanley. Gross’s work has been exhibited at the Richmond Arts Center, Textile Center Minneapolis, Santa Cruz Art League, Museum of Quilts & Textiles, and American Tapestry Biennale 13.

Gross is a member of the Santa Cruz Textiles Arts Guild, Tapestry Weavers West, Handweavers Guild of America, Textile Arts Council and American Tapestry Association where she is currently treasurer of the board.

For many years she worked with blind and visually impaired weavers in a program sponsored by the Santa Cruz Textile Arts Guild.

Gross lives in the Opal Cliffs section of Santa Cruz County with her husband. She holds a BA from Drew University in New Jersey.

•••

Roy and Frances Rydell established the Roy and Frances Rydell Fund for the Visual Arts to the Community Foundation in 1985 to promote artists and arts organizations in Santa Cruz County. After their death, their estate was bequeathed to the foundation. Their donation has generated more than $ 1.4 million in scholarships for artists and in support of visual arts organizations in Santa Cruz County.

The Rydell Visual Arts Fellowship program was developed with input from the local arts community to honor the wishes and intention of the Rydells. The scholarship program, now in its 16th year, has awarded $ 680,000 directly to artists.

(The full list of current and past winners is available at www.cfscc.org/articles/the-rydell-visual-arts-fellowship-program)

Giveaways allow artists to have uninterrupted creative time to focus solely on their work and its impact on the local community and the world at large.

The scholarships help individual visual artists to pursue their creative work and are made solely on the merits of their art and not tied to the completion of specific projects.

“Roy and Frances Rydell understood that artists not only bear witness to life, but play a vital role in helping humanity process our collective experience,” said Susan True, CEO of the Community Foundation. “As we enter the third year of the global COVID-19 pandemic and our community continues to heal from the CZU fires, there is so much life to see and deal with. This new cohort of artists – their diversity in age, origin and form of expression – will help us think, learn, grow and bear witness as life in all its beauty and pain continues. to unfold.

For this round of scholarships, 51 artists applied from a pool of nominees nominated by 26 local and regional visual arts organizations and former Rydell scholars. Applicants were limited to active artists, 25 years of age or older, who reside in Santa Cruz County and are not enrolled in a degree program.

Nominating organizations were invited to consider the broad disciplines that Rydells saw as part of the visual arts: painting, drawing, printmaking, ceramics, sculpture, installation, mixed media, set design, photography, costume design, textiles, glass, film and video.

In October, a panel of three nationally recognized arts professionals gathered at the Foundation to judge the artists’ works and select scholarship recipients. Panel members were Maori Holmes, artistic director and CEO of BlackStar in Philadelphia; Garth Johnson, Paul Phillips & Sharon Sullivan, Curator of Ceramics, Everson Museum in Syracuse; and Astria Suparak, independent curator, former director and curator of contemporary art galleries at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh and Syracuse University.

The $ 80,000 in new Rydell scholarships was complemented by an additional $ 200,000 in unrestricted grants to local arts organizations this spring.

“The artistic scholarships and grants we provide year after year support those who make our local arts landscape as vibrant and vital as it is. The creativity of our local arts community never ceases to inspire us. We are proud of the funding we are able to channel into the arts, and it is because of the people who love this place, see a better future, and act by giving. said Kevin Heuer, Director of Engagement and Impact.

The 2020-2021 Rydell Fellows will be featured in the Rydell Visual Arts Fellowship exhibit at the Downtown Santa Cruz Museum of Art and History from January 21 to March 20, 2022. For more information, visit: https: //www.santacruzmah.org/ exhibitions / rydell scholarship

Community Foundation Santa Cruz County helps donors and their advisers invest wisely in the causes they care about, provide grants and resources to community organizations, and provide leadership around key local issues. The Foundation manages more than $ 168 million in charitable assets and offers personalized, tax-efficient giving solutions that resulted in more than $ 21 million in grants in 2020. Thanks to generous donors, more than $ 131 million Local grants and scholarships have been awarded locally since 1982. The Community Foundation seeks to make Santa Cruz County thrive for all who live there, now and in the future. Learn more at www.cfscc.org.

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Online Writing Course: Writing Life Stories https://akademija-art.net/online-writing-course-writing-life-stories/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 07:30:00 +0000 https://akademija-art.net/online-writing-course-writing-life-stories/ Write On, Door County will stimulate creativity with three writing lessons in January. Robin sauerwein Robin sauerwein will lead the six-week online course Write life stories Saturdays, January 15 – February 19, 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. It is published writer and editor who lives in Minneapolis and has been leading workshops to inspire people […]]]>

Write On, Door County will stimulate creativity with three writing lessons in January.

Robin sauerwein

Robin sauerwein will lead the six-week online course Write life stories Saturdays, January 15 – February 19, 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. It is published writer and editor who lives in Minneapolis and has been leading workshops to inspire people to share their stories for over 10 years.

During this informal class focused on recording life stories, participants can experiment while having fun writing prompts to generate new material and maintain momentum. The participants will share their work in a united manner, non-judgmental frame – this is not a course in criticism. No previous writing experience is required.

Fred schmalz

Tuition fees is $ 120, and Write On members will receive a 10% reduction.

To rejoin Fred schmalz for the multigenre workshop Work on the field Jan. 15, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., when participants discuss what to think about when planning to write in public, focusing on how to choose the locale and prepare to write to it. This course will include a short walk as an opportunity to notice, take notes and write.

Susy Bielak

Schmalz is a artist and poet including the first collection of poetry, Action in orchards, responds to encounters with dance, music and visual arts. It was poet in residence for the Los Angeles Philharmonic’s FluxConcert 2018 during its season fluxus festival.

Registration is required for this program. the suggested donation is $ 20.

Artist, writer and curator Susy Bielak will present “A Visual artist Who Writes ”on January 18, from 4 pm to 5:30 pm During this conference entitled from the self-description of another artist Véronique Gerber Bicecci, Bielak will present some of the many ways in which the visual and verbal meet, share some of his work and discuss the techniques of other artists.

Registration is required for this free, in person program.

To find out more and register for these programs on writeondoorcounty.org.


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Dr Vendryes to leave York for Tufts – York College / CUNY https://akademija-art.net/dr-vendryes-to-leave-york-for-tufts-york-college-cuny/ Wed, 05 Jan 2022 14:19:29 +0000 https://akademija-art.net/dr-vendryes-to-leave-york-for-tufts-york-college-cuny/ Dear York College Community: It is with mixed emotions that I announce that Dr Margaret Rose Vendryes, senior professor of fine arts at York College and ‘Citizen of York’, will be leaving us to become Dean of the School of the Museum of Fine Arts at London. ‘Tufts University. in Medford, Massachusetts, Tufts University is […]]]>

Dear York College Community:

It is with mixed emotions that I announce that Dr Margaret Rose Vendryes, senior professor of fine arts at York College and ‘Citizen of York’, will be leaving us to become Dean of the School of the Museum of Fine Arts at London. ‘Tufts University. in Medford, Massachusetts, Tufts University is a private university founded in 1852. The School of the Museum of Fine Arts, located on historic Boston’s Fenway, was acquired by Tufts in 2015.

Over the course of her long career in York, Dr. Vendryes has brought much more than her teaching skills to our academic endeavor. Her expertise includes a historian, visual artist, curator, and educator both in and out of the formal classroom.

For five years (2015-2021), she was president of the Performing and Fine Arts department and was for a long time director of the Fine Arts Gallery in York. As an academic she has been a professor of art history for over twenty years and is widely published in her field as the author of the book, Barthé: a life in sculpture, (University Press of Mississippi, 2008) which was the first full biography of African-American sculptor Richmond Barthé.

Dr Vendryes has been dedicated to the cause of diversity / inclusion in all its variations including race, gender, members of the LGBQT + community, celebrating diversity and promoting inclusion. Under his leadership, the York College Gallery of Fine Arts expanded its audience to include the outside Queens community. She founded the Southeast Queens Biennale and the very first summer artist residency in Jamaica at York College. Dr Vendryes has held leadership positions on numerous campus-wide committees, including those of Writing Across the Curriculum and the Africa Resource Center. She also served as an LGBTQ + faculty liaison for a while.

As a visual artist, she describes herself as being “concerned with representations of gender, race and cultural identities in the African diaspora”. In particular, his series of paintings and mixed media that have been going on for years The African Diva project is “informed by her commitment to African aesthetics, African-American popular music, and visual culture.” Hyper locally, reproductions of his African diva paintings have been exhibited by the MTA along Jamaica Avenue and in exhibits at the Jamaica Center for Arts and Learning.

The loss of Professor Vendryes from the York family will be enormous. As we celebrate this great news for her, we are saddened to lose the job with such a precious colleague. She served York and her students with passion and dedication; and managed a large collection of African art bequeathed by former York student Victor E. Richards ’79. The impressive collection is on display inside and outside the Africana Resource Center in Hallway 3B.

In the spring of 2016, Professor Vendryes organized an exhibition of the collection and invited Mr. Richards, now deceased, to discuss his history as a collector and what the pieces meant to him personally and historically. His interest in the subject began while he was majoring in art history at York College in the late 1970s. This exhibition, “Gods, Oracles Ancestors: The Victor Richards Collection of African Art at York College is available online at gods-oracles-ancestors.

And while Professor Vendryes will be missed in York, she embraces this new experience. “It’s a new turning point in my professional life and it gave me the opportunity to make a difference in the education of artists,” she says.

Please join me in thanking Professor Vendryes for her years of dedicated service to York College and in wishing her well as she sets out on her new adventure. Currently on sabbatical, we will only see her on campus occasionally during this spring semester, but we want her to know how valuable her service has been to the college.


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Obit: Patrick McNeese played in restaurants, bars in Lexington https://akademija-art.net/obit-patrick-mcneese-played-in-restaurants-bars-in-lexington/ Mon, 03 Jan 2022 15:29:00 +0000 https://akademija-art.net/obit-patrick-mcneese-played-in-restaurants-bars-in-lexington/ Patrick McNeese listens to a mix of a song his band just recorded in this 2013 photo. The Patrick McNeese Band had just recorded “Dreams in the Light” at Shangri-La Productions in Lexington. McNeese died on December 29. Lexington Herald-Leader The definition of the art of Patrick McNeese requires a little precision. You might be […]]]>

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Patrick McNeese listens to a mix of a song his band just recorded in this 2013 photo. The Patrick McNeese Band had just recorded “Dreams in the Light” at Shangri-La Productions in Lexington. McNeese died on December 29.

Lexington Herald-Leader

The definition of the art of Patrick McNeese requires a little precision.

You might be referring to the music he created in restaurants and clubs over the past four decades – a flexible mix of jazz and pop, but ultimately a sound he rarely liked to pin a label on.

But since McNeese was equally comfortable with a canvas and a video camera, you could talk about a number of visual art projects and / or films, the last of which served as his profession.

There were also works designed to appeal to both ears and eyes, such as in recordings like the 2018 album “Big Fish Moon”. The recording featured 11 songs credited to the group that bore McNeese’s name and one of his playful surreal paintings as cover art.

A third-generation Lexingtonian and longtime favorite with the local public, McNeese passed away on December 29 after a long battle with cancer. He was 68 years old.

“He was a dedicated and dedicated artist, both as a painter and as a songwriter,” said Tom Martin, host of WEKU-FM’s “Eastern Standard” and long-time member of the Patrick McNeese Band. . “And, as many will confirm, he enjoyed a good conversation, especially on world affairs, the human condition, nonsense and irony.”

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The Patrick McNeese Group – Tripp Bratton, Maggie Lander, Tom Martin, Patrick McNeese and Jesse Pena. Photo from Thepmband.com.

After attending Christ the King Elementary School and Lexington Catholic High School, McNeese obtained a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Kentucky in 1982. In a short time, he worked as a freelance art director for commercials. (including one with acclaimed director Michael Bay) and industry-trained films as well as independent work on motion picture documentaries.

These were his daily tasks. During his off hours, McNeese performed in a rotating assortment of musical projects. He was a featured pianist at the original Alfalfa Restaurant on South Limestone and performed in the all-acoustic Max Alley Five at haunts as old as High on Rose in the 1980s. Most of his recent work, however, has come with the Patrick McNeese Band, where he played primarily guitar with an intergenerational training including Martin on keyboards, Tripp Bratton on percussion, Maggie Lander on violin, Jesse Pena on lead guitar and F. Miles Hanchett on bass.

The band has worked extensively with veteran local producer and engineer Duane Lundy, who oversees the Lexington Recording Company. Lundy has worked with McNeese on three album projects over the past decade and completed a new solo album last month.

“Pat was a great collaborator for a producer like me,” Lundy said. “He was very prepared when he came to the creative table, but left a lot of room for the contribution. Her songs and performances were a direct part of her personality… intelligent, emotional and organic.

“We started each project with a long conversation about the process we were going to go through, which was filled with more abstract images than clear guidelines. Pat was a true artist, whether it was his music or his paintings. He had a great sense of quality control, but never lost the emotional depth of his work. Our relationship has taught me a lot to stay true to my instincts and not to question my artistic choices.

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Patrick McNeese painted “The Petting Farm,” an oil on paper used as the cover for the “Essential Bluegrass” section of the Herald-Leader, in 1995. It was part of a series created by McNeese in the mid to late 1990s . art print

“Patrick had a very distinctive guitar style,” added Martin. “He admired Joni Mitchell for his unusual chord structures and had an equally distinctive voice. It played and sang and allowed us to research and find our roles to support the lyrics and the mood. You could see her joy as her songs took shape and took on new dimensions.

The last time I saw McNeese was after a performance at the Lexington Opera House. He was not in the audience. I ran into him walking his dog Lola along Short Street. Talk to one of his friends and they’ll likely get a tale of a similar backstage encounter with McNeese on the sidewalks downtown.

A public memorial for McNeese is tentatively planned for the spring.

“My career never really took off,” McNeese told me in an interview in 2005. “He continues to move horizontally across many categories. One thing leads to another. What I learned from playing music – all of your musicianship, really – is key when editing a movie, for example. Most of the time you just edit the beats. The timing is so critical.

“That’s just how I see the world. I always knew I would do different things. My job is to try to keep everything fresh.

This story was originally published January 3, 2022 10:29 a.m.

Related Stories from Lexington Herald Leader


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Book Review: ‘Pilot Impostor’ Proves James Hannaham One of America’s Most Inventive Writers https://akademija-art.net/book-review-pilot-impostor-proves-james-hannaham-one-of-americas-most-inventive-writers/ Sat, 01 Jan 2022 18:04:04 +0000 https://akademija-art.net/book-review-pilot-impostor-proves-james-hannaham-one-of-americas-most-inventive-writers/ James Hannaham’s first two novels, “God Says No” of 2009, and “Delicious Foods,” winner of the 2015 PEN / Faulkner Prize, propelled him to the top of inventive American writers. From now on, the publication of “Pilot Impostor” should secure its place at the top. Hannaham is not only creative or incredibly gifted or intellectual […]]]>

James Hannaham’s first two novels, “God Says No” of 2009, and “Delicious Foods,” winner of the 2015 PEN / Faulkner Prize, propelled him to the top of inventive American writers. From now on, the publication of “Pilot Impostor” should secure its place at the top. Hannaham is not only creative or incredibly gifted or intellectual or supremely original, but he is also all of these distinctions at the same time. This book defying genres of compressed prose, poetry and imagery is the product of a mind – and a heart – pushing the artistic speedometer to the red line.

Its genesis was a flight to Lisbon just after the 2016 election. Hannaham read Fernando Pessoa, the great modernist who inhabited a multiplicity of voices he called heteronyms – some 70+ characters who were both aspects of him – even and whole fabric creations. This protean assemblage offers Hannaham the perfect entryway for an exploration of self, awareness and creativity.

“Pilot Impostor” is the record of a black man observing himself observe a deeply particular moment. The controls of the American experiment were newly in the hands of a man who embodied the “poisoned cocktail of rigged experience and self-confidence,” as Hannaham described in an essay in Bookforum. The role of algorithms in determining what we perceive was increasingly insidious. And he was on his way to a country which had given birth to both the transatlantic slave trade and the strange genius of Pessoa.

The book delves into these themes, and many more, all linked by Hannaham’s visual art and short textual performances, stills from aerial disaster videos, screenshots and fragments of the work of Pessoa. The book is fused so well that it’s hard to extract an example, but I was particularly struck by a list piece titled “To Confound Forensics”. This surreal compilation of ways to get away with murder (# 16: “Be a chimera.”)

Hannaham suggests that each of us now encompasses such a multitude of heteronyms, to fuel algorithms that then feed us, can make anyone a Pessoa. What is the self and how can we know it? The role of chance in determining experience is perhaps the primary subject, but far from the only one, of this ingeniously faceted book. It comes back again and again to the weird fact that much of life now takes place inside a box outside of ourselves to which we outsource our thinking. The computer looks at things for us, thanks to the removal of the eye from the camera; he remembers things that we will forget; with its help, we create alternative “profiles” or selves.

The idea that consciousness is only a contingent arrangement of fragments of experience is reflected in both the structure and content of the book. Hannaham’s short texts – philosophical inquiries, experimental and speculative fictions, prose and poems, even a Bowlesian sonnet – each respond to a brief portion of Pessoa’s poetry floating suggestively in the page margins. These in turn respond to each other, while the author’s subtle ordering raises the question of whether it is possible to one day know the “real” Pessoa. (Answer: is there really someone?)

“Pilot Impostor” has as many beautiful gears as a Swiss watch. Its many organizing principles mean that self-creation only happens over time – we become more “ourselves” as we accumulate the sediment of what happens to us by chance. Some of them are accidents. Some are delivered in our DNA. But we still make something of it – a cognitively informed narrative, a fictional projection, a work of art. Or a book that accomplishes them all.

The visuals are here in conversation with the texts, themselves in conversation with the fragments of Pessoa. Video footage of air disasters, as well as hoax footage that is proliferating online – like the meme known as the “9/11 Tourist Guy” that claimed to show a man on the deck of the World Trade Center moments before a plane does not strike – comment on the ways in which digital obsessions are taking shape.

Other images include the miniature photo assemblies of surfaces (Portuguese tiles, stained glass and mosaics) and openings (sky, grids and perforations), still carrying their digital sizing tools. With them, the artist proposes that factuality is contextual and that perception is only an artifice of composition.

Hannaham’s signature sneaky humor is often accompanied by a surprise touch of acid. Her debut novel is a comedic but compassionate exploration of race, sexuality, and religious hypocrisy that tempers her outrage with absurdism. His second postulates the persistence of the plantation slavery system in contemporary society; where there were chains and whips, there is now drug addiction, for the same purpose. Famous, one of the central characters of “Delicious Foods”, with his own idiosyncratic voice, is crack. Ventriloquism is just one of Hannaham’s many talents.

Melissa Holbrook Pierson is critic and author of “The Place You Love Is Gone”, among other books.


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[Year in Review 2021] Art as creation, communication, culture https://akademija-art.net/year-in-review-2021-art-as-creation-communication-culture/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 04:59:30 +0000 https://akademija-art.net/year-in-review-2021-art-as-creation-communication-culture/ Launched in 2014, Story bites is a regular feature of YourStory, with notable quotes in our previous articles. Share these gems and information with your colleagues and networks, and return to the original articles for more information. Artists, musicians, gallery owners and organizers of festivals and exhibitions share with us their thoughts on the diversity […]]]>

Launched in 2014, Story bites is a regular feature of YourStory, with notable quotes in our previous articles. Share these gems and information with your colleagues and networks, and return to the original articles for more information.

Artists, musicians, gallery owners and organizers of festivals and exhibitions share with us their thoughts on the diversity of art and the role of the public. Check out last year’s art quote compilations here, as well as this year’s quotes on the beauty of art, the journey of an artist, and resilience in the face of a pandemic.

We have divided the 35 quotes in this compilation into five categories: appreciation of the visual arts, music, other forms, art and society, and art in India.

The quotes and photos in this compilation are taken from articles from our weekend PhotoSparks section on art and design, as well as other articles from HerStory, SocialStory and YourStory Weekender. See also our compilations of quotes on the occasion of World Art Day, World Heritage Day, World Music Day, International Jazz Day, and World Photography Day.

Your story wishes the artistic community a Good year to come, with great success, fulfillment and commitment!

Artist – Suruchi Jamkar

Art appreciation

When you bring home an artwork from a charitable fundraiser, you will cherish that memory of making a difference every time you see the painting or sculpture. – Sapna Kar, TheCurators.Art

Knowing the artist, the emotion behind the work and the meaning of the expression often creates a much greater appreciation for their work. – Avik Bandyopadhyay, MayinArt

Art Appreciation brings you a new pair of glasses that gives you unlimited visual experiences. – Jee Yuan Lim, Chitra Santhe

Art is everywhere and is closely integrated into people’s lives – but many live in ignorance or are too busy to observe art. – Madhulika Jain, Chitra Santhe

Art must be seen and experienced. – Ashish Anand, DAG

The story behind the art is sometimes as, if not more, important than the tangible interpretation of this process. It gives you so much more context on the struggles of the time, its historical relevance, and the thinking behind the work. – Arjun Guleria, the Society for the Appreciation of Art

The purpose of art is for the artist to express himself and for the audience to express in response. It’s a two-way street! – Sanjana Shah, Tao Art Gallery

Artist – Ashwini R

The true impact of a painting is felt in person. When you can stare at a painting for hours and fall in love with it, it’s much more intense and real. – Geetanjali Kapoor, Chitra Santhe

Everything that touches your heart is art, and it is present in our daily life. Slow down, look around and you will feel it. – Rohini Choudhary, Chitra Santhe

It is necessary to introduce students to ceramics, photography, weaving and many other various art forms. This will produce an inherent attitude towards the appreciation of art among people of a nascent stage. – Khanjan Dalal

The public can do wonders for artists. Many folk arts only gained popularity with good audiences. – Ritu Sondh, Kala Alankar

Art must touch people, inspire them towards creativity, reality and acceptance. The appreciation of art will then improve on its own. – Deepali S

When people respect the efforts of artists and do not negotiate when purchasing artwork, the appreciation of all art forms will increase. – Manisha Raghunath, Chitra Santhe

Mario Canonge (Martinique) – Borneo Jazz Festival

Music

Music is not just an element of well-being. It is a powerful tool, capable of creating large-scale transformation. – Bindu Subramaniam, SAPA

Music is the universal language … it brings people together. – Ella Fitzgerald

Music is an eternal and living flame that knows no borders. – Eugene Clifford Suboh, O-HA Soul Band

There is always a need to evolve. If you are a music composer, your job is to listen to others and get their validation and approval. – Alokananda Dasgupta

While singing is preferred as a career, songwriting and producing songs is a much less explored space. – Nikhita Gandhi

Jazz inspires creativity and freedom. As a classically trained violinist I wanted to explore other worlds and this led me to jazz. – Nisa Addina, BJF 2021

Jazz is a beautiful balance between brilliance and endless creativity on the way to creating a masterpiece. – Eugene Clifford Suboh, O-Ha Soul Band

The stars are only thought of as the pinnacle of success, but there are a lot of people who are busy within the [music] industry and successfully live fulfilling lives. – Ashutosh Pathak, a real school of music

Busi N’Cube – Forde Festival in 2021

Other art forms

History is queen… and the writer is the maker of queens. – Krishna Udayasankar, A Hit scenario

In comedy, when you’re playing with other people, that’s when you make good jokes. – Saloni Gaur

The camera isn’t everything, don’t think that an expensive camera is going to give you a really good picture. – Navaneeth Unnikrishnan

There is always a mix of conventional and contemporary elements, but regardless of their imagery preference, the photographs will always bring back memories of times past, but deeply cherished. – Shrey Bhagat, KBWPV

Artist – Anna Krzemińska

Art and society

Art can be used to start a dialogue and inspire people to address social issues and issues. – Ruble Nagi, RNAF

Art, along with architecture, is a testimony to humanity, a mirror of its society, its politics and its aesthetics. – Ashish Anand, DAG

Our cultural heritage as a society must be judged by the art we create and leave to posterity. – Edem Elesh, Chitra Santhe

Once done, save your work so that your soul’s voice inspires someone else to listen to their own soul’s voice, even centuries later. – Geeta Arya, Chitra Santhe

The cultural and creative economy represents more than 3% of global GDP. – Abhishek Mukherjee, NICE

Art is a reflection of our time, but it can also focus us, question certain values, and certainly inspire us. – Kishore Singh, DAG

The idea [of a fundraising exhibition] is to spread messages such as peace of mind, non-violence, good humor and helping others. – Mamta Bora, Kala Alankar

Artist – Arun Kumar KV

Art and India

Indian art defies all easily shaped silos to carve out a confident assertion of its own identity. – Ashish Anand, DAG

We need to look at markets beyond Mumbai and Delhi as the art buying market is growing rapidly. – Sapna Kar, TheCurators.art

India is fortunate to have a very wide variety of arts and crafts. -Shibani Jain, Baaya Design

The reason Indian art forms are dying today is because the profession is not economically viable. – Kartikeya Goel, Karfa

Art in all its forms is best appreciated when it becomes the culture of a nation. – Anita Hasurkar, Chitra Santhe

Your story also published the paperback “Proverbs and quotes for entrepreneurs: a world of inspiration for startups” as a creative and motivating guide for innovators (downloadable as apps here: Apple, Android).


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Preview – Decadence 2021 returns for another year of NYE Raving https://akademija-art.net/preview-decadence-2021-returns-for-another-year-of-nye-raving/ Wed, 29 Dec 2021 13:01:15 +0000 https://akademija-art.net/preview-decadence-2021-returns-for-another-year-of-nye-raving/ 2021 is drawing to a close and the Decadence NYE Festival is back in Denver, promising a fantastic lineup of electronic music ranging from the melodic pop hits of ZEDD and Chainsmokers to the deep wubs of Subtronics and REZZ. More than your typical New Year’s Eve celebration, America’s largest EDM event is known for […]]]>

2021 is drawing to a close and the Decadence NYE Festival is back in Denver, promising a fantastic lineup of electronic music ranging from the melodic pop hits of ZEDD and Chainsmokers to the deep wubs of Subtronics and REZZ. More than your typical New Year’s Eve celebration, America’s largest EDM event is known for its extravagances, visual arts, and impressive indoor production. Ultimately, Decadence focuses on music first and foremost. That’s why, year after year, the massive festival offers a unique experience rooted in rave culture that continues to solidify Denver’s reputation as the bass capital of the world.

Above and beyond the crowd. Decadence 2018.

Programming

Decadance is no stranger to impressive queues. Year after year, the NYE festival reserves some of the hottest acts in electronic music, as well as respectable OGs that even the most shallow EDM fan would recognize. This year, their easy picks for electronic pop artists include Steve Aoki, The Chainsmokers, DJ Snake, Louis the Child, and ZEDD. Representing the deeper and wilder side of bass music, Bear Grillz, Subtronics and Herobust. There’s also a healthy mix of house DJs for good measure, including Get Real (Claude Vonstroke & Green Velvet), Walker & Royce and Chris Lake. For fans of trap and hip-hop inspired EDM, you’ll definitely want to catch Zhu and Troyboi.

NYE decadence

Official range. Photo courtesy of Decadence Facebook.

The place

As usual, the Decadence NYE festival will be held in the massive Colorado Convention Center located in the heart of downtown Denver at 700 14th St. The venue has enough space to occupy the festival crowd and the festivities, which include a silent disco, main stage, and curated visual art exhibit with pieces scattered across the venue.

The experience

For better or for worse, Decadence is the stereotypical rave experience. All of the traditional antics and weird behaviors that are typically associated with rave culture are usually on display in Decadence. From faux fur coats, spandex and fishnets to kaleidoscope glasses, glowing finger gloves and lots of sequins. Everything is here. It’s traditionally a younger crowd, although many seasonal ravers attend each year. It’s a party from start to finish, and Insane Ball Drop is a rare sight that’s usually paired with insane bass drop from the headliner.

Schedules of events

6:30 p.m. to 3 a.m. on December 30 and 31.

Decadence 2018

Covid 2021 policy

Last year, COVID prevented Decadence from happening. This year the festival is back with some important safety precautions in accordance with CDC guidelines and local ordinances. According to the Decadence website, their COVID security policy is as follows:

“By Colorado State Ordinance, 9th Amended Public Health Ordinance 20-38, all unseated, open to indoor public events of 500 or more people in Adams, Arapahoe, Boulder, Jefferson and the City and County of Denver and the City and County of Broomfield will require all people 12 years of age or older to be fully immunized to be admitted to the indoor event. Therefore, all customers must provide proof of vaccination for entry. Acceptable documentation can be a physical copy of a COVID-19 vaccination registration card, a digital copy of that card, or other locally authorized evidence. A front / back photo of your vaccination record will be accepted. Proof of vaccination must be accompanied by photo identification.

Get tickets here.

Bassnectar. Decadence 2018.


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