Visual Art – Akademija Art http://akademija-art.net/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 00:07:11 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://akademija-art.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-150x150.png Visual Art – Akademija Art http://akademija-art.net/ 32 32 Philadelphia Contemporary projects a floating gallery on the Delaware River https://akademija-art.net/philadelphia-contemporary-projects-a-floating-gallery-on-the-delaware-river/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 00:07:11 +0000 https://akademija-art.net/philadelphia-contemporary-projects-a-floating-gallery-on-the-delaware-river/ It’s not that Harry Philbrick has to go back to the seas. But when you’re landlocked and have no home, the song of the sirens of the sea can seduce and hypnotize. And so it is that Philadelphia Contemporary, the eclectic and nomadic arts organization founded by Philbrick some seven years ago, will do something […]]]>

It’s not that Harry Philbrick has to go back to the seas.

But when you’re landlocked and have no home, the song of the sirens of the sea can seduce and hypnotize.

And so it is that Philadelphia Contemporary, the eclectic and nomadic arts organization founded by Philbrick some seven years ago, will do something virtually unprecedented in this city or anywhere else: it will build and float an art gallery on a barge on the Delaware River.

Once there, art on the water can turn into mobile art, which can move along the river and out to sea – perhaps to Cape May or New York. A little Philly is coming to a port near you soon.

Most of the time, however, the two-story gallery will be moored north of Penn’s Landing between the docks at Race Street and Cherry Street.

For Philbrick, the waterfront is one of the city’s great democratic spaces. Also, a floating gallery is just plain cool; an idea that fits perfectly with the philosophy of his organization.

“One of the goals of Philadelphia Contemporary is to be an institution whose audience reflects Philadelphia’s diversity,” Philbrick said Tuesday. “Building a big new building on the outskirts of University City, we weren’t going to live up to that…we were likely to create an institution whose audience would end up looking like everyone else.”

The organization has raised enough funds to complete the conceptual planning and technical studies for the gallery, he says. That’s over a million dollars. Upcoming: fundraising for the construction, which will be around 20 to 25 million dollars.

Philbrick has been intrigued by the idea for a few years, ever since he heard about the Floating Water Workshop the Philadelphia Water Department is launching at the Fairmount Water Works.

» READ MORE: Philly Water Department gets $3 million to build floating classroom on Schuylkill at Fairmount Dam

“I thought to myself, ‘My God, if you can have a floating classroom, why can’t you have a floating gallery?’ “, did he declare.

The Seafaring Philadelphia Contemporary is designed by Philadelphia-based firm Atkin Olshin Schade Architects. AOS is known for a variety of cultural projects, including the renovation of Louis Kahn’s Richards Medical Research Laboratory building in Penn and the design of the Anne d’Harnoncourt Sculpture Garden at the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

Their contemporary Philadelphia design features a two-story gallery space atop a custom-built barge, all covered in solar panels that will generate 100% of the energy needed.

The design has already received a COTE citation from the American Institute of Architects, Pennsylvania for excellence in environmental design.

“The Floating Gallery’s immediate access to the river serves as an intellectual anchor for curatorial programs and enables local artists to use water as a medium,” the quote reads in part. “In addition to its ability to provide a space for artists to share their work, the installation’s location on the river creates opportunities for visitors to learn more about how their lives are connected to the waterway. .”

Architect Sam Olshin said the gallery is being designed with the expectation that it will move – perhaps to Camden or Cape May or perhaps “around the Jersey Shore and up to New York”.

But the move presents a whole new whirlwind of safety rules for sailing, so it was decided the gallery could only be pushed and pulled by tugs. That said, even mooring the barge between the Cherry and Arch Street piers presents environmental issues. What impact, for example, would the shadow of the gallery have on life in the river bed?

“We’ve had a long conversation with all the Delaware River people in New Jersey and Pennsylvania regarding the approvals and I think we’re in really good shape there,” Olshin said.

Much of the preliminary design work has been completed and the Delaware River Waterfront Corp. fully supports the project.

The building will host both performance and visual arts, Olshin said, with the two-story structure atop the barge offering 14,000 square feet of gallery space.

The art barge has some precedents, including architect Louis Kahn’s floating concert barge which was created for the bicentenary in 1976. It was saved from destruction in a scrap yard a few years ago and could be used again, moored at the PECO power station at Penn Treaty Park, currently under renovation.

READ MORE: Louis Kahn-designed musical barge could drop anchor in Philadelphia as a concert stage

Olshin said there was still maybe six to eight months of design work left, plus another six months to complete the permitting process, and then “probably 18 months to build it.”

Philbrick is willing to wait for the fundraising climate to improve. In the meantime, “we continue to do our programming in the city,” he said.

“In the fullness of time, if we can achieve that, that would be just thrilling,” he said. “The vision is to create a space where we can do programming, but also where partner organizations can do programming. And this again, is an integral part of our DNA.

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AI drew this wonderful comic book series. You would never know https://akademija-art.net/ai-drew-this-wonderful-comic-book-series-you-would-never-know/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 18:34:00 +0000 https://akademija-art.net/ai-drew-this-wonderful-comic-book-series-you-would-never-know/ You might expect a comic book series featuring entirely AI-generated artwork to be full of surreal imagery that makes you tilt your head trying to grasp the kind of mind-altering madness. meaning you look. That’s not the case with the footage from The Bestiary Chronicles, a free three-part comic book series from Campfire Entertainment, a […]]]>

You might expect a comic book series featuring entirely AI-generated artwork to be full of surreal imagery that makes you tilt your head trying to grasp the kind of mind-altering madness. meaning you look.

That’s not the case with the footage from The Bestiary Chronicles, a free three-part comic book series from Campfire Entertainment, a New York-based production house focused on creative storytelling.

In The Lesson, a teacher tells students about the monsters that destroyed their planet. The team behind the comic used the phrase “Hitchcock Blonde” to describe the story’s heroine to AI art generation tool Midjourney, “and more often than not she looked like Grace Kelly,” says writer Steve Coulson.

Campfire, halfway

The visuals for the trilogy – believed to be the first comic book series made with AI-assisted art – are stunning. They’re also incredibly accurate, as if straight out of the hand of a seasoned digital artist with a very specific story and style in mind.

“Deep underground, the last remnants of humanity are gathering to learn more about the monsters that destroyed their planet,” reads a description for The Lesson, the third visually-rich retro-futuristic comic in the trilogy. All three are available to download now from the Campfire site, and are also available in hardcover and softcover print anthologies.

While the AI-generated visual art may tend toward the absurd, the photorealistic humans in The Bestiary Chronicles don’t have rearranged facial features, or protruding limbs at odd angles. The monsters – with their glowing eyes and surprisingly bad teeth – look like love children to Godzilla and Vhagar and can hardly be mistaken for anything other than rage-filled beasts.

This algorithm-assisted art seems tailor-made for the dark dystopian tale, which draws on tropes from the 1960 sci-fi horror film Village of the Damned and THX 1138, George Lucas’ feature debut in Hollywood. 1971.

“We’re seeing the rise of an all-new visualization tool that will dramatically change the storytelling process in the comics and entertainment industry in general,” said Steve Coulson, Trilogy Writer and Director. award-winning Campfire creative, who has created immersive fan experiences for shows such as Ted Lasso, Westworld and Watchmen. Its founders imagined the Blair Witch project.

For The Bestiary Chronicles, Coulson turned to Midjourney, a service that quickly turns short text sentences, or “prompts,” into images by scanning a giant database of visual art trained by humans. Artificial intelligence tools like this, Slab and Stable Broadcast are capture the imagination of the internet because they allow anyone to manifest images from text in intriguing and sometimes disturbing ways.

The Bestiary Chronicles is a 114-page science fiction odyssey about monsters born of human technological hubris. But it also highlights the remarkable progress of products like Midjourney, which are producing increasingly sophisticated and polished images.

“By the new year, even the trained eye probably won’t be able to spot one generation of AI among the rest,” Coulson said. “It’s exciting and terrifying at the same time. But you can’t put the genie back in the bottle, so we’re embracing the future as fast as we can.”

The generation of AI images is progressing so rapidly, he adds, that The Lesson, released on November 1, marks a clear visual step forward from the first comic in the trilogy, Summer Island, a story of folk horror in the mind of Midsommar which came out in August. During these three months, Midjourney underwent two upgrades.

A sepia-toned apocalyptic landscape from The Lesson comic

AI art-generating tool Midjourney has done an impressive job spitting out images of a bleak post-apocalyptic landscape for The Lesson, the third in a trilogy of comic books from production house Campfire.

Campfire, halfway

AI, partner of art

“Technology is changing our world, with artificial intelligence both a new frontier of the possible but also an anxiety-laden development,” said Thomas P. Campbell, director and CEO of the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, during the exhibition Uncanny Valley: Being Human in the Age of AI opened in 2020 to explore the ever-expanding space where humans and artificial intelligence meet.

AI generating visual art, composing songs and even write poetry and movie scripts fuel some of that anxiety, raising ethical and copyright issues among artists and even lawyers. AI art is not created in a vacuum. It works by absorbing and reconstructing existing art created by humans. As machine-made art improves, will these humans – real graphic designers, illustrators, composers and photographers – find themselves unemployed?

When an AI-generated image won an art award in September, some artists weren’t happy. “We watch the death of art unfold before our eyes,” one Twitter user wrote.

Coulson, an avid comic book reader since age 5, is among those pondering the complex questions raised by AI art, but he doesn’t think tools like Midjourney will replace comic book artists. comics that he has loved for a long time. “These geniuses have an eye for dramatic composition and dynamic storytelling that I highly doubt machine learning can match,” he wrote in the afterword to Summer Island. “But as a visualization tool for non-artists like me, it’s a lot of fun.”

Dragons with open mouths and sharp teeth look like something out of House of the Dragon

Has Midjourney watched House of the Dragon?

Campfire, halfway

He does, however, consider Midjourney his true collaborator in The Bestiary Chronicles, even giving him author credit. Where a comic book artist can design a narrative and then create art to illustrate it, AI-assisted imagery has the potential to more actively direct the story, or even change its direction, thereby redefining in a way spectacular the entire creative workflow. Coulson compares this man-machine duo to improvisational jazz.

“I would never ask a human artist to just ‘draw 100 splash pages and maybe pick the one I like best’, but Midjourney will happily spit them out 24/7,” Coulson says. . “Then, after going through the footage, we start putting the story together, almost like a collage act, filling in the gaps along the way.”

The AI ​​art is the star here, but the humans had the deciding hand in which images were incorporated into the final version of each story. They experimented with text prompts and carefully selected their final images from several Midjourney offerings, making a Photoshop tweak here and there, but mostly leaving the work done to the machine.

The Campfire team, for example, liked the rich effect produced by the “olive green and sepia and teal newt print on watercolor paper” style prompt, so they often used it to give images an effect. pictorial. For The Lesson, the phrase “futuristic underground bunker in the style of JC Leyendecker” yielded the perfect retro-futuristic post-apocalyptic refuge.

“We also used the phrase ‘Hitchcock Blonde’ to describe our heroine, and more often than not she looked like Grace Kelly,” Coulson said. She’s a perfectly recognizable Grace Kelly, with no misplaced ears or dog muzzle.

“The advances in AI image generation over the past few months have been exponential and breathtaking,” Coulson said, “and this technology is only going to get better — faster than we can imagine.”

A page from The Exodus, showing rockets pointing upwards

Exodus, the second comic in the trilogy, chronicles humanity’s last attempt to save itself from the monsters that roam the planet.

Campfire, halfway

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Method in the madness at ‘Fear to Tread’ https://akademija-art.net/method-in-the-madness-at-fear-to-tread/ Sun, 13 Nov 2022 17:52:10 +0000 https://akademija-art.net/method-in-the-madness-at-fear-to-tread/ “Fear to Tread”, the inaugural exhibition of Roger That! Gallery + Studios at Roger Williams University, is a somewhat harsh viewing experience that nevertheless manages to be engaging, curious, and ultimately rewarding. The gallery is housed in an unassuming building a few blocks from downtown Bristol, Rhode Island. On the evening of the opening, in […]]]>

“Fear to Tread”, the inaugural exhibition of Roger That! Gallery + Studios at Roger Williams University, is a somewhat harsh viewing experience that nevertheless manages to be engaging, curious, and ultimately rewarding.

The gallery is housed in an unassuming building a few blocks from downtown Bristol, Rhode Island. On the evening of the opening, in order to view the exhibition, visitors passed through a large hall that serves as a common studio space for Roger Williams’ art students, many of whom were on hand to enjoy the festivities and display some of their own works.

Curator Alexander Castro mixes the work of regional contemporary visual artists with initially head-scratching choices including an inkjet reproduction of an early 20th-century entrance photograph depicting the entrance to Ferrycliffe Farm, the site on which RWU now exists, credited to Herbert Marshall Howe (possibly), a 1991 naïve landscape painting by an unknown artist, and an advertisement for Osteo Bi Flex, originally printed in a 2003 issue of Ladies ‘ Home Journal.

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Austin Studio Tour 2022 Is All Over the Map: Annual ATX Art Celebration Expands to Match the Size of the City https://akademija-art.net/austin-studio-tour-2022-is-all-over-the-map-annual-atx-art-celebration-expands-to-match-the-size-of-the-city/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 06:20:10 +0000 https://akademija-art.net/austin-studio-tour-2022-is-all-over-the-map-annual-atx-art-celebration-expands-to-match-the-size-of-the-city/ Pele tutu by Regina Allen (Art courtesy of Austin Studio Tour) Introducing the 2022 Austin Studio Tour, a free, self-guided celebration of visual art, offering in-depth insight into the work areas and showrooms of Austin-based artists and creative collaborations, three weekends of special exhibits and installations and craft demonstrations and, well, you to know there […]]]>

Pele tutu by Regina Allen (Art courtesy of Austin Studio Tour)

Introducing the 2022 Austin Studio Tour, a free, self-guided celebration of visual art, offering in-depth insight into the work areas and showrooms of Austin-based artists and creative collaborations, three weekends of special exhibits and installations and craft demonstrations and, well, you to know there will likely be all kinds of afterparties rocking the city north, south, east, and west, for that matter.

Paint. Sculpture. The Woodcraft. Wall paintings. Glassware. Metallurgy. Bonding. New media manifestations in all sorts of innovative flexes. So much art in so many forms, created by a diversity of creative humans, brand builders and culture boosters. Here, in your city, just waiting to amaze your senses.

Los Angeles Landscape 2 by Korok Chatterjee

Here comes the second weekend – but where does this annual event come from? In 2003, local artists Jana Swec, Joseph Phillips and Shea Little decided to organize an event that would support their own works and showcase the East Austin artist community. Their creation, the first East Austin Studio Tour, was a one-day event, free and open to the public, featuring 28 studios and 50 artists, all contested by Swec, Phillips and the band Little’s Big Medium – which became a non-profit organization to do everything possible. In 2012, the East Austin Studio Tour was so successful that they extended it to two consecutive weekends and, that spring, inaugurated the West Austin Studio Tour to also celebrate artists on the sunset side. from I-35.

It’s been a while now. Been a pandemic, come and (albeit persistently) gone. And now, this year, the Austin Studio Tour is back in full swing and packed with at least 500 participating artists. This year, the three-weekend tour takes place across the city, with the geographical boundaries expanded to include all 10 city council districts. The first weekend (November 5-6) highlighted the west; the second is a west/east combo; the third is the east. But, listen, this tour isn’t just about east and west — increasingly, north and south Austin are here too.

Korok Chatterjee has no formal training in art, although the pictures he draws and paints provide eye proof of the strange visions a talented autodidact can commit on paper with graphite, ink and watercolor. . His work is featured – along with a variety of creations by Laura Clay Hernandez, Max Voss-Nester, Ruby Powell and others – at the Commune, an arts-focused collaborative workspace built in an abandoned locksmith’s shop on North Loop (101 E. North Loop). “I’ve only been in Austin for two years – and half of that time was the peak of the pandemic – so joining the tour was a great way to meet people and connect with the art scene here,” we said. Chatterjee said. “It’s also inspiring to see so much artwork from my co-artists – great motivation to pursue bigger projects!” This ambition will be exhibited in the space of the Commune this weekend. “I’ll have a lot of drawings, but I’ve been into oil painting for the past two years, so I’m really looking forward to this first chance to exhibit paintings.”

Anchor your heart by Leslie Kel

Regina Allen (8208 Wexford) is on the west side of I-35, but also well beyond the city’s central pedestrian areas and quite north: near McNeil Drive and Highway 183. Allen is a talented landscape artist, her vast palette of pigments capturing “the enduring beauty and tenacity of nature, expressing tentative hope as well as concern over global climate change.”

“This will be the first time I’ve participated from my own studio,” she explained. “In the past, I’ve been part of group efforts in other places, so I’m very happy to open up my actual workspace next to my artwork. I think my process will be a lot more obvious. The tour is a great excuse to clean up come up to my studio and take a look at my various works. My most recent ones start with small watercolor studies, which inspire larger oil paintings – I will exhibit these watercolors as well as many of my oils during the tour.

Further west (and south) are the Circle C Creatives (7817 La Crosse), a group brought together by Meena Matai, whose mixed-media abstract works are the stuff of your best color dreams. This group caught our attention because its number includes the Chronicle art-crush Leslie Kell, who we continue to rave about as his digitally manipulated works, synthesizing design and photography to explore “the elusive nature of our perceptions and the ever-shifting currents of our realities”, do things to our brains which only do better recreational drugs than we can afford to perform.

Peacock by Brian Phillips

“I’ve been on one or both studio tours since 2011,” said Kell (whose work will also be part of TreeGarden’s “Life of H2O” celebration this weekend), “although last year was the first time Big Medium pushed the boundaries far enough to include the far Southwest. I’ve made some of my best relationships, met inspiring people, and met wonderful artists and collectors over the years. latest collection, “Thin Places,” will also be part of an exhibit during the grand reopening of the Jewish Community Center in early 2023. “I combine sacred geometry as manifested in nature with photos of places few places I’ve visited: cathedrals, glass chapels, Sedona.”

If we’re talking south, we reckon Slaughter Lane would qualify – and Brian Phillips’ workshop (11402 Chapel) is a bit below that, his longtime workshop built with the same kind of reclaimed wood he “cuts, planes, paints and reassembles… into something entirely new.” The man has a penchant for turning acrylic paint into colorful cowboy portraits on reclaimed wood, and it’s the kind of art that will make you glad you’re a Texan. “I’ll be starting some bigger pieces for a group show at the Commerce Gallery in January after the tour,” Phillips said, noting that this year’s citywide show isn’t his first rodeo. “For me, being part of the Austin Studio Tour means playing a part in the local arts scene at the most community level I think you can get. The atmosphere is always great and it’s a great way to help to support local working artists. Big Medium always showcases artists in such a beautiful way, with catalogs and now the app.”

Let’s point this out for you, reader: the Austin Studio Tour has its own app, which works especially well if you have a smartphone and already know which studios you want to visit. (Just our recommendations here should keep you busy for a while.) Business Cards – Printed! – on paper! – are now available at Austin public libraries. Additionally, the annual catalog of the tour has been elevated to pure coffee table status, with more information than you will ever parse and a design so beautiful and effective that it matches what the best of the artists represented could create; the impressive tome is available from Big Medium (916 Springdale Bldg. 2 #101) for the second two weekends. And, yes, their brand new website (austinstudiotour.org) is an equal miracle of data-driven beauty. As Phillips, a wood salvager with Western influences, said, “Big ways are best.”


Austin Studio Tour 2022, November 12-13 and 19-20. Details and map at austinstudiotour.org.


Need help getting started? Read our roundup of the five recommended stops on the Austin Studio Tour.

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The Hong Kong visual effects artist behind the viral Instagram video of a Tetris game featuring Choi Hung Estate – YP https://akademija-art.net/the-hong-kong-visual-effects-artist-behind-the-viral-instagram-video-of-a-tetris-game-featuring-choi-hung-estate-yp/ Sun, 06 Nov 2022 06:00:30 +0000 https://akademija-art.net/the-hong-kong-visual-effects-artist-behind-the-viral-instagram-video-of-a-tetris-game-featuring-choi-hung-estate-yp/ Imagine a Tetris game in which colorful blocks fall not from the top of the screen, but from the sky onto Hong Kong’s iconic rainbow-hued Choi Hung Estate. Fantasy scenes like this are Ben Mok Wang-hin’s specialty. The 24-year-old visual effects artist is known for gamifying the cityscape, reimagining its popular streets and attractions. “I […]]]>

Imagine a Tetris game in which colorful blocks fall not from the top of the screen, but from the sky onto Hong Kong’s iconic rainbow-hued Choi Hung Estate.

Fantasy scenes like this are Ben Mok Wang-hin’s specialty. The 24-year-old visual effects artist is known for gamifying the cityscape, reimagining its popular streets and attractions.

“I spent over 30 hours in post-production…but before that I needed to brainstorm ideas and come up with a workable plan to execute it,” Mok said of his Tetris video. , which has garnered over 15 million views on Instagram. when it was featured by popular meme account, 9gag, in June.

For Mok, his job is not just about showing special effects to impress an audience. It’s also about turning Hong Kong’s unique features into spectacles that people outside the city can also enjoy.

“I want to feature Hong Kong elements in all of my videos…I want people to know there’s someone from Hong Kong doing these special effects,” Mok said.

Hong Kong is where the magic happens

Visual effects artists work magic on a screen – they use digital art software to make everything from explosions to superpowers look real.

Some of Mok’s most popular works are short clips featuring Marvel comic book characters. One shows the Creator’s hand taking Thor’s hammer, causing a storm to swirl across the port of Tsim Sha Tsui.

In another clip, a famous Hong Kong calligrapher, whose shop was in danger of closing, is reduced to ashes, highlighting how government redevelopment plans have forced legendary businesses to close or relocate.

The artist draws his inspiration from his daily life and popular trends. For example, the Tetris video pays homage to his love for the classic arcade game.

From filming to adding effects, Mok creates these videos himself, but the post-production process is arduous. His videos take between 20 and 100 hours to make. Besides his collaborations with brands, the artist creates most of his videos for fun.

“I haven’t seen anyone else do it for free because it’s very time-consuming and laborious work,” Mok said, adding that he considers YouTube his “teacher.”

“I learn everything I need from social media platforms, and I make those skills my own.”

Hong Kong in motion: the artist shares his joy by illustrating MTR scenes

The pandemic gave a new beginning

Mok only started working on special effects a year and a half ago – although he has been making videos for eight years, since high school.

He recalled his enthusiasm during computer class at school, as he proactively offered to help classmates who were struggling to learn video editing. In 2017, the young artist started producing short films and travel vlogs to post on YouTube.

But due to travel restrictions during the pandemic, Mok was forced to stop. “Since I couldn’t travel anymore, the limitations pushed me to do other things,” he explained.

During his days off at home, he would watch all kinds of YouTube tutorials to learn new skills. “Video editing is my interest, I don’t like to sit idly by,” he pointed out. “I could watch video tutorials all day… studying how certain effects are created.”

A Young Hong Kong Artist’s Journey to Bringing His Visuals to Life in Hollywood

Two years ago, he uploaded his first special effects video to YouTube, in which he added classic game elements to landscapes from old travel footage. It was a way to present his new vision of his profession.

“There was no income at first,” Mok said, adding that he had only found work as a visual effects artist in the last six months.

But the positive feedback he received for his Choi Hung Estate breakout video gave him the confidence to continue building a career from those skills.

Today, Mok is an in-demand video creator who has collaborated with popular brands such as Discover Hong Kong, Times Square, and 9gag. “Collaborating with brands to work on special effects videos and posts has always been what I’ve wanted to do,” he said.

Grow in the right direction

On his YouTube channel, Mok includes tutorials that unveil his magic tricks by explaining complex editing steps for those who want to learn more about visual effects.

He said he wasn’t afraid to teach others his techniques and style, adding, “Actually, I hope the visual effects artist scene in Hong Kong can grow.”

For those looking to develop these skills, Mok advised starting with special effects from Marvel Studios movies, as the internet has plenty of tutorials and guides for scenes from these popular films.

While social media algorithms help creators’ short videos gain exposure, Mok isn’t just interested in garnering views.

“Some might take advantage of it and copy other people’s work just to go viral. It’s not healthy,” he said, adding that he preferred to spend time creating quality videos.

Although life as a freelancer can be “very unstable,” Mok said, he never thought of giving up his creative freedom to join a production company.

“My ultimate goal is to be able to make a living creating the content I love, which doesn’t require me to compromise my ideas,” he said. “So far, I consider myself living in a dream.”

Click on here for a printable worksheet and interactive exercises on this story.

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LABA Jewish art “laboratory” moves to SF’s Firehouse – J. https://akademija-art.net/laba-jewish-art-laboratory-moves-to-sfs-firehouse-j/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 21:55:50 +0000 https://akademija-art.net/laba-jewish-art-laboratory-moves-to-sfs-firehouse-j/ LABA East Bay, the “laboratory” of Jewish culture that supports local artists through its annual fellowship program and hosts live showcases, is now called LABA BAY. As part of an expansion, the local hub of the international LABA network changed its name and moved its headquarters from the Jewish Community Center of the East Bay […]]]>

LABA East Bay, the “laboratory” of Jewish culture that supports local artists through its annual fellowship program and hosts live showcases, is now called LABA BAY.

As part of an expansion, the local hub of the international LABA network changed its name and moved its headquarters from the Jewish Community Center of the East Bay to the Firehouse in San Francisco. Philanthropist and author Anne Germanacos, who has funded LABA East Bay since its founding in 2019, will take a more active role with the organization. Germanacos owns the Fire Station, a converted auto repair shop in the SF neighborhood of Cole Valley that serves as a Jewish community gathering space, among other uses. The building will host the inaugural LABA BAY events for Fellows, Alumni and Friends on November 13-14.

“The JCC East Bay was a wonderful home for LABA, and it allowed us to test the model here and incubate it,” said Elissa Strauss, artistic director of LABA BAY who previously worked at the original LABA in New York. “I feel like we’ve brought a lot of life and culture to the [JCC] building across LABA, and then there was this feeling that it could meet a greater need across the bay.

Ava Sayaka Rosen’s tarot cards on display at the LABAlive event on November 7, 2021.

Strauss said she and Germanacos plan to hold more LABA events for the public at the fire station and will work to connect scholars and alumni to more Jewish institutions where they can share their artistic gifts. “I now have all these people that I want to share with the community at large,” she said. Alumni include singer Rabbi Jessica Kate Meyer, members of the musical ensemble San Francisco Yiddish Combo, actress and juggler Sara Felder, dancer Marika Brussel, poet Jake Marmer, and visual artists Ava Sakaya Rosen and Naomie Kremer.

Of Germanacos, Strauss added, “I feel very aligned with her intellectually, spiritually, and creatively, and I’m so happy to not only work alongside her, but also learn from her.”

In an interview, Germanacos told J. that she was drawn to LABA because it is an innovative, non-religious program that prioritizes artistic freedom. “It is to offer the possibilities inherent in Judaism and particularly through the Jewish text to people who have already found their way in the world – and I do not mean their way practically speaking, but spiritually speaking – through the imagination and through their art, whatever it is,” she said.

It’s a pretty special space, and people tend to feel special when they’re there.

The fire station, which Germanacos bought in 2016, is an ideal location for LABA fellows, she noted. “While the JCC they’ve shared with a lot of other people, it’s theirs while they’re there,” she said. “And it’s a pretty special space, and people tend to feel special while they’re in it.” (The fire station is a different building from the event space of the same name at the Fort Mason Center for Arts & Culture.)

Germanacos, 64, launched her Germanacos Foundation in 2009 with money she inherited from her stepfather, wealth manager Claude Rosenberg, and her mother, Louise. Through the foundation, Germanacos funds a wide range of local and international Jewish organizations – including San Francisco-based Jewish LearningWorks and Berkeley-based Jewish Voice for Peace and Jewish Studio Project – as well as non-Jewish organizations. She is also a founder and member of The Kitchen, an independent Jewish congregation that meets regularly for Shabbat morning services at the fire station.

When asked why she felt called to support the arts, and more particularly LABA, she explained how she had gone back and forth at different times in her life between her identity as a Jew and her identity as a writer ( she has published several storybooks, poetry and pictures). “At this point, having lived in some sort of organized religious situation [at the Kitchen] for 10 years I’ve kind of been ready to go – it’s not exactly backwards, but forwards in the artistry, and bringing other people in as well, and so LABA is perfect,” he said. she stated.

The crowd at a cooking event at the fire station.
The crowd at a cooking event at the fire station in 2020.

Each year, LABA brings together a cohort of up to 10 local Jewish cultural creators – musicians, dancers, actors, visual artists, writers and others – to study excerpts from the Torah, Talmud and other Jewish texts on a specific theme. , then create new works. around the theme. Applications are currently being accepted for the 2022-2023 scholarship, which comes with a $1,000 stipend. The theme is “taboo” and the deadline to apply is November 18.

A traveling visual art exhibit created by LABA fellows titled “Comment!” is currently on view at the Osher Marin Jewish Community Center in San Rafael until January 4. After that, he will be transferred to the Peninsula Jewish Community Center in Foster City.

Other LABA hubs are located in New York, Buenos Aires and Berlin, with planned pop-ups in Los Angeles and London. Each hub raises funds independently and receives financial support from parent organization Educational Alliance.

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The Día de los Muertos, the children of Uvalde, we remember the teachers https://akademija-art.net/the-dia-de-los-muertos-the-children-of-uvalde-we-remember-the-teachers/ Tue, 01 Nov 2022 09:30:00 +0000 https://akademija-art.net/the-dia-de-los-muertos-the-children-of-uvalde-we-remember-the-teachers/ The tweet was just one sentence, but it was heartbreaking. “We should choose her Halloween costume together, but instead I’m making her an ofrenda,” tweeted Ana Rodriguez, mother of 10-year-old Maite Rodriguez, who had dreams of becoming a marine biologist and cared about the environment. Maite was one of 19 children who were killed, along […]]]>

The tweet was just one sentence, but it was heartbreaking.

“We should choose her Halloween costume together, but instead I’m making her an ofrenda,” tweeted Ana Rodriguez, mother of 10-year-old Maite Rodriguez, who had dreams of becoming a marine biologist and cared about the environment.

Maite was one of 19 children who were killed, along with two teachers, in the Robb Elementary School shooting in Uvalde, Texas in May.

They are honored by communities across Texas and nationwide as part of Día de los Muertos, or Day of the Dead, traditions, which honor deceased loved ones with ofrendas or altars.

According to tradition, at midnight on October 31, the souls of deceased children descend from heaven and reunite with their families on November 1, and the souls of deceased adults come to visit them on November 2.

It is celebrated with colorful ofrendas that families and communities create to honor their deceased loved ones.

Several cities across the country hold events and parades and create colorful altars. This year, the faces of the 19 children who died in Uvalde were atop altars across the country.

At San Antonio’s “Muertosfest” on Saturday, Lainer High School’s art club tribute went viral on TikTok. The altar created by the students consisted of 20 custom desks – one honoring each of the 19 deceased students and one for the two educators.

The tribute simulated a classroom where all student desks faced the teachers desk. Members of the community wiped away tears as they stopped to take photos and view the altar, Texas Public Radio reported.

Families of the victims were also allowed to take the desks home if they wished, according to the radio service.

In Chicago, the 36th annual Day of the Dead exhibition at the National Museum of Mexican Art, or NMMA, honors Uvalde’s victims by including an installation ofrenda created by students from Bernhard Moos Elementary School.

Monarch butterflies represent the souls of deceased students, and two skeletal angels above symbolize teachers who died trying to protect them. Fake yearbooks contain brief descriptions of things each child liked.

In the corner, next to two desks and a blackboard, is a pecan tree, which represents Robb Elementary School. On the board is a poem by Nahuatl poet Mardonio Carballo emphasizing the relationship between every living thing and those who nurtured and cared for it.

“Because of the amount of gun violence, we could do an entire exhibit commemorating just the victims,” ​​said Cesáreo Moreno, NMMA’s director of visual arts and chief curator. “It’s become a more difficult exhibit to organize, and we have to be careful not to normalize mass shootings.”

This is not the first time the NMMA has honored victims of gun violence. The museum has created ofrenda installations dating from the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting in Connecticut in 2012, the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting in Florida in 2018, the Pulse nightclub shooting in Florida in 2016 and the shooting in El Paso, Texas, in 2019.

“You can’t help but look at the headlines and think, ‘Oh, this tragedy needs to be remembered in a way that contains some hope, tragic as it is,'” Moreno said. “We have a long tradition of doing this every year. When Cesar Chavez died in 1993… the UFW [United Farm Workers] came and committed an offence.

NMMA’s “Día de Muertos, Memories & Offerings” exhibit is free and will run through December 11.

In Houston, the nonprofit arts and culture group Multicultural Education and Counseling Through the Arts (MECA) honored Uvalde’s 21 victims, including murals with the children’s names. “We repeat people’s names over and over so they won’t be forgotten,” curator Luis Gavito told KHOU-TV.

Remember – and push for change

In Texas, in addition to altars and commemorations, several Latin American organizations, community leaders and elected Democrats — members of the Mexican American Legislative Caucus — mark Día de los Muertos by marching and advocating for gun control legislation. .

The Marcha de los Niños, or March of the Children, will take place in several cities in a special tribute to the victims of Uvalde.

“We felt it was an opportune time for us to use something that is so important and part of our cultural traditions…as an opportunity to remind people of the tragedy,” the statement said. one of the organizers, Paul Saldaña, co-founder. of the advocacy group Hispanic Advocates Business Leaders of Austin.

Austin organizers will begin their march, led by nine families of victims, on the Capitol steps with a vigil and procession, ultimately ending at the Governor’s mansion in downtown Austin, where an ofrenda will be placed in front the manor.

“I think it serves as a very powerful reminder of what’s at stake,” Saldaña said.

Follow Latin NBC on Facebook, Twitter and instagram.

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A grant from the Foundation will reorganize the NTO gallery https://akademija-art.net/a-grant-from-the-foundation-will-reorganize-the-nto-gallery/ Sat, 29 Oct 2022 21:16:24 +0000 https://akademija-art.net/a-grant-from-the-foundation-will-reorganize-the-nto-gallery/ With a grant from the Education Foundation, George HW Bush New Tech Odessa art teacher Jesus Valeriano decided to revamp an exhibition space for the work of students, teachers, and even the community. He received a $5,876 grant from the Educational Foundation for the Enkindle Gallery. The grant went to a new suspension and lighting […]]]>

With a grant from the Education Foundation, George HW Bush New Tech Odessa art teacher Jesus Valeriano decided to revamp an exhibition space for the work of students, teachers, and even the community.

He received a $5,876 grant from the Educational Foundation for the Enkindle Gallery.

The grant went to a new suspension and lighting system, Valeriano said.

“We had a gallery, but for the past two years it’s been a COVID room,” he said.

Principal Gerardo Ramirez said each campus must have a designated area to limit exposure to COVID. At the NTO, it was the art gallery.

With the grant, the gallery will reopen.

“I just got the stuff for this last week,” Valeriano said.

He added that probably in the next few weeks he will induct a National Art Society chapter and the opening of the gallery.

“We are delighted to update our art gallery, thanks to the Education Foundation. Our art learners are thrilled. They have been working diligently to prepare for the reopening of the art gallery,” director Gerardo Ramirez said in a text message.

Valeriano said the grant will make the gallery super cool.

“We really have everything we could have dreamed of to create a real gallery,” Valeriano said.

Last year, he won a grant for the equipment of the Phoenix ceramic room. They had pottery wheels, but they had to borrow kilns from Permian High School or the University of Texas Permian Basin.

“But this year we finally put in place… the ventilation system and all the necessary protections against it.”

NTO has about 150 students in its art program. The school has about 500+ students.

“The art program is really good and the kids are participating, so even when they’re not making art, they’re competing and participating in the state art competitions,” Valeriano said.

The students were working on the National Fossil Art Competition which he said he has won every year since they started doing it. The competition is organized by the National Park Service.

They also participate in VASE, or the Visual Arts School Event.

“We do pretty well every year. We won two state spots last year, and hopefully we can do it again this year,” Valeriano said.

Valeriano encouraged other teachers to apply for Educational Foundation grants. They like grants that will help students discover things or see things from a different perspective.

“They support you. The help is there,” Valeriano said.

The Foundation holds workshops to help teachers write grants.

“They really aren’t complicated. They are super easy to write. They really almost give you a step by step of the things you need. And I think people have the wrong idea of ​​what writing a grant entails. It’s really easy and if they see that your plan is going to make your school better and help your kids get a different perspective on what they’re learning, they’ll be 100% behind you,” Valeriano said.

He already has two scholarships.

“And they’re going to change schools. One of my arguments for my grant for the ceramics room was the sanity of the staff so that all the teachers could go pottery. It’s very therapeutic,” he added.

He hopes the first show will showcase the work of ECIDD employees.

“It’s really amazing. I think they impact more people than they realize. It’s really great. I’m thinking of setting up the whole pottery room and now having a whole gallery , it’s a dream for me. I have my classroom and everything, but now I have a pottery room and now I have a whole gallery,” Valeriano said.

For an art teacher like him, he says, it’s like a dream.

“It may sound simple, but it isn’t, but it’s all about curation. It really is a step above for any art teacher, or even for children. They will know what it is like to run an art gallery,” he added.

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A vision for overhaul at Lit & Luz https://akademija-art.net/a-vision-for-overhaul-at-lit-luz/ Wed, 26 Oct 2022 21:05:42 +0000 https://akademija-art.net/a-vision-for-overhaul-at-lit-luz/ The Lit & Luz Festival of Language, Literature, and Art (Lit & Luz) brings together writers, visual artists, and musicians from Mexico and the United States with the goal of fostering cultural exchange. The artistic results of these cross-cultural experiences, from poetry to photography and everything in between, are then presented through a series of […]]]>

The Lit & Luz Festival of Language, Literature, and Art (Lit & Luz) brings together writers, visual artists, and musicians from Mexico and the United States with the goal of fostering cultural exchange. The artistic results of these cross-cultural experiences, from poetry to photography and everything in between, are then presented through a series of bilingual performances. The festival is presented first in the United States and is reset for a presentation in Mexico the following winter, with the same group of collaborating guests.

In Chicago, the ninth edition of the festival kicks off at noon on October 31 with a virtual keynote by Californian poet Anthony Cody. The festivities continue that evening with an artist talk at the Logan Center for the Arts featuring guest Balam Bartolomé with Esteban King, while at The Insect Asylum is the Halloween edition of Favorite poems featuring Kathleen Rooney, Robin Myers, Yolanda Segura, Kailah Peters and Olivia Maciel, among other readers. The festival runs through November 5 with a final celebration at the Chicago Art Department. Events include readings, workshops and artist talks (some offer a virtual option) at venues across the city. The festival’s flagship celebration, the Live magazinewhich features final performances created by collaborative duos, formed by one artist from the United States and the other from Mexico, takes place at the Logan Center for the Arts on Thursday, November 3.

Lit & Luz Festival
31/10-5/11, various locations, most events free and for all ages. For the full schedule, details and locations, visit litluz.org.

Lit & Luz 2022 includes Mexican authors Dolores Dorantes, Mariana Oliver and segura, as well as visual artists Bartolomé, Aura Arreola and Héctor Jiménez Castillo. Chicago-based collaborators include authors Marty McConnell, Gabriel Ojeda-Sagué and Antonio Díaz Oliva (ADO), as well as visual artists Victoria Martinez, Amber Ginsburg, Laleh Motlagh and musician Andy Slater.

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Art exhibitions | visual arts https://akademija-art.net/art-exhibitions-visual-arts/ Mon, 24 Oct 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://akademija-art.net/art-exhibitions-visual-arts/ “Horse Power” – 6-9 p.m. October 27, Artist Angle Gallery, 124 S. Carroll St., Frederick. New paintings by Rebecca Pearl. 240-285-3758 or theartistangle.com. “Breathtaker: the revolutionary graphic novel, from concept to comic” – until October 29, McDaniel College, Esther Prangley Rice Gallery at Peterson Hall, 2 College Hill, Westminster. Featuring original artwork in conjunction with […]]]>

“Horse Power” – 6-9 p.m. October 27, Artist Angle Gallery, 124 S. Carroll St., Frederick. New paintings by Rebecca Pearl. 240-285-3758 or theartistangle.com.

“Breathtaker: the revolutionary graphic novel, from concept to comic” – until October 29, McDaniel College, Esther Prangley Rice Gallery at Peterson Hall, 2 College Hill, Westminster. Featuring original artwork in conjunction with the remastered edition of Mark Wheatley and Marc Hempel’s acclaimed graphic novel “Breathtaker”. Features over 90 original artworks and explores the creative and physical processes undertaken during the original production of the “Breathtaker” comic book in the 1990s, as well as how the artwork was re-adapted over the stages of preparation for the reissue of Titan Comics. Release. 410-857-2595 or estherprangleyricegallery.com.

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