Performing Arts – Akademija Art http://akademija-art.net/ Thu, 24 Nov 2022 02:30:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://akademija-art.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-150x150.png Performing Arts – Akademija Art http://akademija-art.net/ 32 32 Best Holiday Art Events and Shows in San Diego https://akademija-art.net/best-holiday-art-events-and-shows-in-san-diego/ Thu, 24 Nov 2022 02:30:00 +0000 https://akademija-art.net/best-holiday-art-events-and-shows-in-san-diego/ Yiddishland California: “Artistic walk on the theme of Hanukkah” visual art Yiddishland California just opened a year ago as a cultural center and hub for Jewish and Yiddish arts and culture – it’s in the heart of La Jolla, run by the Yiddish Arts and Academics Association of North America (YAAANA ). They are having […]]]>

Yiddishland California: “Artistic walk on the theme of Hanukkah”

visual art

Yiddishland California just opened a year ago as a cultural center and hub for Jewish and Yiddish arts and culture – it’s in the heart of La Jolla, run by the Yiddish Arts and Academics Association of North America (YAAANA ).

They are having a Hanukkah-themed event on the First Friday Art Walk, with a market of Judaic — Jewish ceremonial art and objects used in rituals and traditions.

The art walk also marks the opening of an exhibition by painter Miriam Libhaber. Libhaber was born in Mexico City and has a background in architecture that still influences her work, not just in her cityscapes, but even the way she paints forests evoke clusters of skyscrapers.

It is part of the La Jolla First Friday Art Walk, so there will be plenty to see throughout the village area. Hanukkah this year starts from December 18 to December 26.

Details: 4-7 p.m. Friday, December 2, 2022. Yiddishland, 1128 Wall St., La Jolla. Free.

A step beyond: ‘El Alebrije’

Ballet

“El Alebrije” is a reimagining of the Nutcracker ballet, inspired by Mexican culture. In pre-Hispanic Mexican culture, an Alebrije is a spirit guide, and the term is also used for carved and painted animal figurines, as well as a sense of fantasy or fantasy – which follows as a spin on Nutcracker dolls.

Courtesy of One Step Beyond

The dancers from A Step Beyond are featured in the 2021 production of “El Alebrije.”

This is an outdoor show at the Kit Carson Amphitheater in Escondido, with a single performance. There is a huge cast, including 150 students from the A Step Beyond ballet school. The story, costumes and props are transformed in the Mexican tradition, but the music is the same “Nutcracker Suite” by Tchaikovsky.

Details: 6:30 p.m. Saturday, December 10, 2022. Kit Carson Amphitheater, 100 Amphitheater Dr., Escondido. General admission is $10, children under 5 are free.

Nutcracker Tea Parties: San Diego Ballet and Scripps Performing Arts Academy

Ballet

If you want to go all out for the ultimate “Nutcracker” experience with a tea party, the Scripps Performing Arts Academy will be hosting their Holiday Tea and Holiday Brunch “Nutcracker” performances at the Fairmont Grand in Del Mar. Tea is the Friday, December 1. 23 ($88+) and brunch is Saturday, December 24 ($100+).

The San Diego Ballet will also be hosting a Nutcracker Tea Party at Liberty Station on Sunday, December 18 ($55 and up).

chris-dragon-web.jpg

Conductor Christopher Dragon will lead the San Diego Symphony Orchestra for “Noel Noel” from December 9-11, 2022.

San Diego Symphony Orchestra: “Christmas Christmas”

music, storytelling

“Noel Noel” is a mix of story telling and acting and holiday music. It’s a new story and storyline this year, so if you’ve seen it in the past, it will feel new. It is conducted by Christopher Dragon (Wyoming Symphony), and the San Diego Symphony, San Diego Master Chorale and San Diego Children’s Choir will perform.

Details: 7 p.m. Friday, December 9, 7 p.m. Saturday, December 10 and 5 p.m. Sunday, December 11, 2022. The Rady Shell at Jacobs Park, 222 Marina Park Way, Downtown. General admission is $20+.

San Diego Gay Male Choir: ‘Jingle’

Music

“Jingle” is the annual holiday show of the San Diego Gay Men’s Chorus (San Diego Gay Man’s Chorus), and it also kicks off their 38th season, now with their new artistic director, Dr. Charles Beale. The event celebrates how music — especially song — is an integral part of how we commemorate the holidays. The SDGMC will perform holiday classics with music from Eric Whitacre, The Temptations, James Taylor and more.

Details: 8 p.m. Dec. 10 and 3 p.m. Dec. 11, 2022. Balboa Theater, 868 4th Ave., Downtown. General admission is $30+.

Cygnet Theater: “A Christmas Carol”

Theater

This production of the Charles Dickens classic has original music and puppets, plus everything we know and love about that story. Artistic director Sean Murray will play Scrooge. Murray notably voiced all of the characters from “A Christmas Carol” for a one-man streaming adaptation of the play during the pandemic.

cygnet-christmas-carol.jpg

Ken Jacques / Cygnet Theater

An earlier production of “A Christmas Carol” at the Cygnet Theater is shown in a 2019 photo.

You can find shows at the Old Town Cygnet Theater almost every day until Christmas Eve, including some with American Sign Language interpreters.

Details: Until December 24, 2022. Cygnet Theatre, 4040 Twiggs St., Old Town. General admission is $30+

San Diego Botanical Garden: “Lightscape”

visual art

“Lightscape” is an immersive installation along a one-mile pathway inside the San Diego Botanical Garden in Encinitas, featuring over a million lights. There are tunnels of light, pyrotechnics, sculptures, and visual art activations along the way. There are timed entry tickets available in the evenings until January 1, and they recommend around an hour and a half.

Winter Cathedral.jpg

Courtesy of San Diego Botanical Garden

The “Winter Cathedral” installation at “Lightscapes” is shown in an undated photo. The light show runs at the San Diego Botanical Garden through January 1, 2023.

The trail has sections of dirt and hills, so comfortable shoes are recommended. Strollers and wheelchairs are permitted, although some sections with steps require a detour and/or assistance from staff.

Details: 5pm-8.30pm Nov 18-20, 23, 25-27; 1-4, 8-11, 14-23, 26-31 Dec. ; January 1st. San Diego Botanical Garden, 230 Quail Gardens Dr., Encinitas. Admission is $13 to $29.

La Jolla Music Society: Holiday Songs

Music, Books, Crafts

The La Jolla Music Society’s “Holiday Sing-Along” features the Pacific Coast Harmony Choir, along with a La Jolla librarian for a reading of “‘T’was the Night Before Christmas.”

Plus, artists from the Spanish Village Art Center will guide families in creating their own pop-up greeting cards. This is a free event, held in the outdoor courtyard, and you can bring a book to donate to the Friends of La Jolla Library.

Details: 5 p.m., Sunday, Dec. 11, 2022. Wu Tsai QRT.yrd at the Conrad Prebys Performing Arts Center, 7600 Fay Ave., La Jolla. Free entry.

Art products: “Holiday market of handicrafts”

Visual arts, Shopping

There are so many gift markets, but don’t miss the Craft Works Holiday Market at Art Produce. The market is open every weekend through the end of the year and is brimming with handmade goods courtesy of faculty, students, and friends of San Diego City College’s arts program, including jewelry, candles, soaps, ceramics, textiles and works of art. It takes up the entire front gallery of Art Produce in North Park, and 70% of every purchase goes directly to the artist and the rest supports Art Produce, which is a non-profit organization.

Details: 2-6 p.m. Thursday and Friday; noon to 6 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, through Dec. 30, 2022. Art Produce, 3139 University Ave., North Park. Free entry.

For more winter holiday events, visit our special holiday calendar listings. For more art events and editor’s picks, check out the KPBS/Arts Calendar.

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Nutcracker Tea Previews Upcoming Performances at The Morris https://akademija-art.net/nutcracker-tea-previews-upcoming-performances-at-the-morris/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 05:31:00 +0000 https://akademija-art.net/nutcracker-tea-previews-upcoming-performances-at-the-morris/ SOUTH BEND, Ind. (WNDU) – Hundreds of people gathered at the Palace Royal Ballroom in South Bend for the Southold Dance Theater Nutcracker Tea. To celebrate the forthcoming Southold production of The Nutcracker, nearly 400 guests enjoyed tea with a remarkable display of the famous winter ballet. The event also included ballet lessons, arts and […]]]>

SOUTH BEND, Ind. (WNDU) – Hundreds of people gathered at the Palace Royal Ballroom in South Bend for the Southold Dance Theater Nutcracker Tea.

To celebrate the forthcoming Southold production of The Nutcracker, nearly 400 guests enjoyed tea with a remarkable display of the famous winter ballet.

The event also included ballet lessons, arts and crafts for children, and a formal tea time with traditional treats accompanied by tea.

Southold is a nationally acclaimed pre-professional dance company entering its 49th season and currently has dancers ranging in age from 3 to 78 years old.

The South Bend Symphony Orchestra will collaborate with Southold and perform The Nutcracker at the Morris Performing Arts Center from December 9-11.

“This tea is just to celebrate the official launch of The Nutcracker season, even though we’ve been training for a few months now, but to share this with our children who are coming with their families,” said Sarah Taylor, executive director of Southold Dance. Theater. “Also, it’s our 41st Nutcracker who is in person due to the pandemic. This would be our 43, our first comeback was last year, but this one is going to be amazing due to the fact that the (South Bend) Symphony Orchestra is back for the first time in over 20 years.

In a statement from Southold:

Southold Dance Theater presents The Nutcracker

WHEN: Friday, December 9 at 7 p.m. (new show time this year) * Saturday, December 10 at 7 p.m. * Sunday, December 11 at 2 p.m.

WHERE: The Morris Performing Arts Center, 211 N Michigan St.

South elbow, IN 46601

TICKETS: $25 – $65

Online – www.morriscenter.org

Telephone – (574) 235-9190

Box Office – 211 N Michigan St, South Bend, IN 46601

As a fundraiser, the Southold Dance Theater will be hosting a Nutcracker preview titled Nostalgia on Thursday 8th December. Guests will get an up-close look at the production with a dress rehearsal and accompaniment from the South Bend Symphony Orchestra. Guests will be the first to experience this collaboration for the first time in over 20 years. Tickets are $100, including cocktails and hors d’oeuvres, and a few surprises. For reservations, please call (574) 233-9841.

About Southold Dance Theater

Southold Dance Theater is a nationally acclaimed pre-professional dance company currently entering its 49th season. Under the guidance of professional staff, dancers strive to achieve mastery of technique and performance. Many dancers successfully audition for some of the country’s most prestigious dance institutions. Many have embarked on a career as a professional dancer. As the resident dance company of the Morris Performing Arts Center, Southold enriches its audience with high standards of performance. To find out more, please visit Southold-Dance.org.

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U of A Bands will hold the last concert of the fall season https://akademija-art.net/u-of-a-bands-will-hold-the-last-concert-of-the-fall-season/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 06:06:37 +0000 https://akademija-art.net/u-of-a-bands-will-hold-the-last-concert-of-the-fall-season/ Center on the U of A campus.” width=”100%”/> Photo submitted Faulkner Performing Arts Center on the U of A campus. U of A Bands will present the Wind Ensemble and Wind Symphony at the second concert of the Fall 2022 semester at the Jim and Joyce Faulkner Performing Arts Center at […]]]>



Center on the U of A campus.” width=”100%”/>

Photo submitted

Faulkner Performing Arts Center on the U of A campus.

U of A Bands will present the Wind Ensemble and Wind Symphony at the second concert of the Fall 2022 semester at the Jim and Joyce Faulkner Performing Arts Center at 7:30 p.m. on Monday, November 21.

The Wind Symphony will perform four pieces. Percy Grainger’s “Spoon River”, conducted by graduate assistant Jason Reznicek, is a concert band arrangement of an American folk fiddle tune. John Mackey’s “Sheltering Sky,” conducted by assistant bands manager Chase Jones, evokes the spirit of folk music, even though the music is original to Mackey.

“Romanian Folk Songs” by Bela Bartok, conducted by Associate Bands Manager Jeffrey Summers, showcases the beauty of Eastern European folk songs. Jones will then lead the Wind Symphony finale with the Mediterranean-inspired piece “Opa!” by Julie Giroux.

After the Wind Symphony, the Wind Ensemble will open its concert with “Early Light” by Caroline Bremer, conducted by Jones.

“Bremer’s piece is based on his experiences growing up, going to baseball games and hearing the national anthem beforehand. As such, you hear many quotes from the anthem throughout the piece. “Jones said.

In the spirit of patriotism, the Ensemble à Vents will perform the “French Suite” by Darius Milhaud, under the direction of Summers.

“This piece is a collection of French folk songs that commemorate French and American soldiers who fought in World War II,” Summers said. “Each movement is based on a different part of France.”

Originally written as a string quartet, the Wind Ensemble will next perform “Nocturne” by Zhou Tian, ​​transcribed for orchestra by David Thornton. “‘Nocturne’ was inspired by the cold and isolation of winter,” Summers said.

The last performance of the evening will be “Fascinating Ribbons” by Joan Tower. The U of A was part of a consortium that commissioned this piece from Tower in 2001.

Admission to performances is free, but a ticket is required. Tickets can be purchased from the Faulkner Performing Arts Center.

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Seesaw Inclusive Theater Festival Returns This Year https://akademija-art.net/seesaw-inclusive-theater-festival-returns-this-year/ Mon, 14 Nov 2022 05:25:15 +0000 https://akademija-art.net/seesaw-inclusive-theater-festival-returns-this-year/ Ashton Goren, Associate Arts and Entertainment EditorNovember 13, 2022 Seesaw Theater presented its seventh annual Inclusive Theater Festival on Saturday and Sunday – a weekend-long conference that invites local theaters serving diverse audiences to celebrate progress and collaborate. At Northwestern, Seesaw’s mission is to produce entertainment for audiences with disabilities. Weinberg Jr. and ITF conference […]]]>

Ashton Goren, Associate Arts and Entertainment Editor

Seesaw Theater presented its seventh annual Inclusive Theater Festival on Saturday and Sunday – a weekend-long conference that invites local theaters serving diverse audiences to celebrate progress and collaborate.

At Northwestern, Seesaw’s mission is to produce entertainment for audiences with disabilities. Weinberg Jr. and ITF conference director Monica Williams said Seesaw began researching and contacting festival attendees over the summer. One of the challenges of inclusive theater is visibility, she said. The ITF therefore seeks to raise awareness of the various types of theatre.

“I’ve been doing theater since fourth grade and (inclusive theatre) had never even entered my realm of possibility until first grade,” Williams said. “The ITF is a place where students and professional artists come together and really talk about how things are going in the world of creative theater for people with disabilities.”

This year’s festival is the first in-person conference since 2019. Presenters from Evanston and Chicago gave talks and held workshops at the Norris University Center for theater professionals, the disability community and educators working in inclusive theatre.

Rachel Hilbert, Communications Senior and Artistic Director of Seesaw, said inclusive theater is a relatively new field, so the festival is looking to connect new companies and artists to share inclusive theater production strategies.

“Sensory theater is so broad in terms of how you can do it and how you can do it well,” Hilbert said. “There’s so much to take away from every organization that does things like this.”

Hilbert said Seesaw’s primary audience is made up of both NU students and members of the Evanston and Chicago-area community with disabilities, including people with autism. Hilbert said Seesaw also produced shows for blind and deaf viewers.

Because Seesaw’s mission is broad, Hilbert said the conference can educate attendees about different types of audiences. She said it was important to understand the differences so cinemas could offer viewers better specificity and accommodation.

“It’s really exciting that there are enough people in the world doing inclusive art,” Hilbert said.

Some speakers included members of Babes with Blades, a theater company that recently produced “Othello” with an all-female, trans, and gender-nonconforming cast. Gianni Carcagno, theater manager and technician in Chicago, gave a workshop on subtitling and accessibility.

Special Gifts Theater gave a presentation on productions for actors with disabilities. The company brought student ambassadors to the conference to demonstrate typical production strategies, such as prompt-based improvisation. Other techniques were modified to accommodate the actors; the team shortened the songs for those who felt more confident performing a shorter piece.

Debbie Taus-Barth, Director of Program Operations at SGT, said the company is one of Chicago’s only therapy-based performing arts programs.

“We use the stage as a platform for skill building and social trust,” Taus-Barth said during the presentation. “Everything we do is adaptive and very specific to each student in our program.”

Taus-Barth said last season, a non-verbal, hearing-impaired actress played Dorothy on “Wizard of Oz.” The team changed the script to accommodate her disability and highlight her ability to play the role non-verbally, she said. Other actors verbally told the story to hear the audience, and Taus-Barth said the actress “was able to shine” through physical storytelling.

Williams said she is very excited that inclusive theater can open artistic doors for more artists and audiences. She said the ITF is not just about making theater accessible to more viewers, but is also a celebration of the contributions of various artists to the performing arts.

“Inclusive theater takes this art form that we all love so much and makes sure that every person can participate in it, however their heart desires,” Williams said.

E-mail: [email protected]

Twitter: @ash_goren

Related stories:

Nine years later, the Seesaw Theater co-founders reflect on its past

Seesaw Theater produces theater designed for audiences

Students and faculty address the lack of racial diversity in North West theater and discuss potential solutions to the challenges

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The Ben Markley Big Band will perform with UW Jazz Ensembles November 16-17 | New https://akademija-art.net/the-ben-markley-big-band-will-perform-with-uw-jazz-ensembles-november-16-17-new/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 17:37:58 +0000 https://akademija-art.net/the-ben-markley-big-band-will-perform-with-uw-jazz-ensembles-november-16-17-new/ November 11, 2022 Ben Markley The Ben Markley Big Band will perform two public concerts with jazz ensembles from the University of Wyoming as part of the group’s residency at UW from November 15-17. The group will perform with UW Jazz Combos on Wednesday, November 16 at 7:30 p.m. in the Recital Hall of the […]]]>

November 11, 2022

Ben Markley

The Ben Markley Big Band will perform two public concerts with jazz ensembles from the University of Wyoming as part of the group’s residency at UW from November 15-17.

The group will perform with UW Jazz Combos on Wednesday, November 16 at 7:30 p.m. in the Recital Hall of the Buchanan Center for the Performing Arts. The concert is free and open to the public.

The group will next perform with the Wyoming Jazz Ensemble on Thursday, November 17 at 7:30 p.m. in the Performing Arts concert hall. Tickets are $14 for the public, $10 for seniors, and $8 for students. To purchase tickets, visit the Performing Arts Box Office, call (307) 766-6666 or go online to www.tix.com/ticket-sales/uwyo/6984. UW faculty and staff, and military personnel can purchase tickets at a discounted rate. To receive the discount, visit the Performing Arts Box Office between noon and 6 p.m. Monday through Friday or call (307) 766-6666.

Ben Markley, director of jazz studies at UW and jazz pianist, will be joined by special guests Jake Boldman, Melissa Gardiner, Jon Gauer, Dan Jonas, Steve Kovalcheck, Dawn Kramer, Brad Leali, Marcus Lewis, Jim Pisano, Peter Sommer, Ashley Summers, Rob Tapper, Sam Williams and Shawn Williams. UW Music Department faculty members Scott Turpen, saxophone professor, and Andy Wheelock, assistant professor and percussion area coordinator, will also perform.

The concert on November 16 will feature the four jazz combos performing a number of jazz standards.

UW Jazz Combo IV will perform works by Duke Ellington, Thelonious Monk and Herbie Hancock. Micah Miller, a UW student from Casper, will lead the combo.

UW Jazz Combo III will perform a selection of works by Slide Hampton, Miles Davis, Ellington, Tadd Dameron and Hank Mobley. Seth Lewis of the UW music department, professor of double bass, is the director of the combo.

UW Jazz Combo II will perform works by Benny Golson, Bob Reynolds and Horace Silver. Ryan Fourt, a jazz guitar teacher in the UW music department, leads the ensemble.

The UW Jazz Combo I program will feature works by Miller and Johnny Mercer. Markley will lead the combo.

For the November 17 concert, the Wyoming Jazz Ensemble will present a program of works composed and arranged by Markley. The Ben Markley Big Band will follow with works by Markley, Cedar Walton, Dizzy Gillespie and Mal Waldron.

Guest artists will also give masterclasses to students in the UW Music Department throughout the residency.

For more information, call Kathy Kirkaldie, UW Fine Arts Coordinator, at (307) 766-2160 or email kirisk@uwyo.edu.

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Invention and innovation at the heart of QF’s reesha performing arts festival https://akademija-art.net/invention-and-innovation-at-the-heart-of-qfs-reesha-performing-arts-festival/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 09:27:00 +0000 https://akademija-art.net/invention-and-innovation-at-the-heart-of-qfs-reesha-performing-arts-festival/ The second edition of the D’reesha Performing Arts Festival, which takes place during the FIFA World Cup Qatar 2022™, is expected to include a component dedicated to invention and innovation which, through art, music and astronomy, will help bring science to life. The STEAM-focused addition, titled D’reesha of Invention and Innovation, will allow visitors to […]]]>

The second edition of the D’reesha Performing Arts Festival, which takes place during the FIFA World Cup Qatar 2022™, is expected to include a component dedicated to invention and innovation which, through art, music and astronomy, will help bring science to life.

The STEAM-focused addition, titled D’reesha of Invention and Innovation, will allow visitors to conduct experiments and participate in hands-on workshops, while learning about various local scientists, scholars and researchers and their contributions to the world.

“QF’s D’reesha Performing Arts Festival reflects the belief that learning does not just take place within the four walls of the classroom, and that creative, innovative and diverse forms of education can empower children. children and young people,” said Ameera Al Aji. , Community Arts Manager at QF.

“D’reesha of Invention and Innovation will encourage children and their families to engage in STEAM activities in fun, meaningful and tangible ways, inspiring them to explore their curiosity while helping to fuel a quest for lifelong learning. life.

“And this year, as the country welcomes visitors from around the world for the World Cup, we will be able to show how Education City, through this festival, is a center of knowledge that inspires learning, discovery and exploration. .”

Sharing this belief, sponsor ConocoPhillips Qatar. “Children are naturally curious and will always ask questions about the world around them, and we at ConocoPhillips Qatar recognize that a progressive upbringing in the local community can help our youngsters embrace that curious side and make learning a habit,” said Todd Creeger, President of Conoco Phillips Qatar.

“As proud sponsors of D’reesha of Invention and Innovation, we are thrilled to support an educational initiative that promotes scientific discovery while highlighting the rich history of research and scholarship in the Arab world, which is replete with pioneers who helped shape modern ideas and technologies.

A number of local partners have also organized activities for D’reesha of innovation and invention. Texas A&M University in Qatar, a QF partner university, will present its popular robotics arena, while Qatar General Electricity & Water Corporation (Kahramaa) has prepared theatrical performances, competitions and science experiments on the theme of energy quality. water, as well as workshops on electrical energy and the environment.

The Qatar Scientific Club will host an exhibition space dedicated to women in science, and CurioCITY will provide an interactive wall of motion sensors combining modern technology with physical activity. Finally, the Museum of Illusions will host a play area for children, as well as dilemma games and puzzles for people of all ages, alongside its popular optical illusion exhibits.

QF’s D’reesha Performing Arts Festival will be held in Education City from December 11 to 17 under the theme “Travel and Adventure”. Open to all, it will present a variety of performances in Arabic and English, ranging from music and poetry to visual arts and theatre.

To learn more, visit www.qf.org.qa/dreesha

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The new performing arts center is blessed https://akademija-art.net/the-new-performing-arts-center-is-blessed/ Sun, 06 Nov 2022 21:00:03 +0000 https://akademija-art.net/the-new-performing-arts-center-is-blessed/ St Peter’s College welcomed a number of special guests for the official opening of its new performing arts center at its Clyde North campus on Thursday 27 October. Principal of the college Chris Black was joined by MP for Cranbourne Pauline Richards, Catholic Bishop of the Diocese of Sale, the Reverend Greg Bennet and Maria […]]]>

St Peter’s College welcomed a number of special guests for the official opening of its new performing arts center at its Clyde North campus on Thursday 27 October.

Principal of the college Chris Black was joined by MP for Cranbourne Pauline Richards, Catholic Bishop of the Diocese of Sale, the Reverend Greg Bennet and Maria Kirkwood, Director of Catholic Education and Chief Executive of the Diocese of Sale, to bless the building .

The $15 million “GEODE CENTER” is a state-of-the-art, 450-seat performing arts center designed not only for academic performing arts learning, assemblies and conferences, but also for the local community at large. wide.

Funding came from the Catholic Development Fund (CDF) through a $9.5 million loan, the college contributed $1.5 million in cash reserves and the Government of Victoria contributed $4 million in financial support through the Catholic Capital (Victoria) Limited Program.

Ms Kirkwood said the joyful sounds of students singing praises on stage underlined the school community’s enthusiasm and pride in presenting this wonderful contemporary learning space.

“I am sure that in the months and years to come, this center will be a place of lively and dynamic learning activities, involving many people sharing ideas and growing together,” said Ms. Kirkwood.

“This blessing ceremony provides an opportunity for all of us to come together to thank and recognize the contributions of so many to creating a center of teaching excellence where young people can thrive.”

Mr Black explained the origins of the building’s name, telling the audience it was inspired by the school’s namesake.

“A geode is a spherical rock structure that has a durable outer wall with inner layers revealing the beauty of a cavernous core,” he said.

“In our context, the rock is synonymous with our patron Saint Peter with all the beauty of the central space that will only be realized in the performances that will be presented in this space.”

The Performing Arts Center took 12 years to build.

The current center and accompanying facilities took three years to design and two and a half years to build, encompassing state-of-the-art sound and lighting.

The backstage and biobox facilities will provide exceptional technical excellence to support productions and events.

Mr. Black said that around the theater on the ground floor and upstairs are a suite of classroom spaces, changing rooms, rehearsal spaces and green rooms, and that he it is a center both campuses can be proud of.

“The stage itself is a wonderful expanse to showcase the talents of our students,” Mr. Black said.

“My special thanks go to Mr. Phillip Mustey, Sales Manager and Mr. Adam Bonnici, our maintenance agent.”

The ‘GEODE CENTRE’ was designed and built with consideration not only of the performing arts learning needs of St Peter’s College, but also the needs of the local community.

The facility is available to hire, bringing much-needed meeting/performance space to the communities of Clyde North, Cranbourne and surrounding suburbs. For inquiries please contact the college at officecln@stpeters.vic.edu.au

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Architect Selection Schedule Established for New Performing Arts Center | sarasota https://akademija-art.net/architect-selection-schedule-established-for-new-performing-arts-center-sarasota/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 09:00:00 +0000 https://akademija-art.net/architect-selection-schedule-established-for-new-performing-arts-center-sarasota/ A week after its formation, the committee tasked with recommending an architectural firm to design the Sarasota Performing Arts Center project at The Bay met on Monday to kick off the six-month process. That’s the time frame given to the panel by New York-based Paratus Group, a consulting firm that guides museums and cultural institutions […]]]>

A week after its formation, the committee tasked with recommending an architectural firm to design the Sarasota Performing Arts Center project at The Bay met on Monday to kick off the six-month process.

That’s the time frame given to the panel by New York-based Paratus Group, a consulting firm that guides museums and cultural institutions through complex construction projects.

Primarily an orientation meeting, the five-member SPAC Architect Selection Working Group introduced themselves to each other, as necessary, and to the public. He also received instructions from Assistant City Attorney Michael Connelly regarding Florida’s sun laws, which require transparency in all matters relating to public investments.

They were also educated about Florida’s Consultant Competitive Negotiation Act, which sets out the process for government agencies, municipalities, school boards, and school districts to engage professional services using a selection process based on qualifications rather than on the basis of the lowest offer.

“That applies whenever an agency — of which the city is an agency — goes for professional service,” Connelly said. “These professional services are architects, engineers, landscape architects, surveyors and cartographers, so this applies to all of you because you are looking for an architect. You must follow the CCNA’s statutory procedures.

This is a three-step process that begins with a public announcement of the qualification process, beginning with a request for qualification process, applications from which a band will be selected to meet a performance request. The RFQ was to be released by the end of the week.

The second stage of the process consists of reducing the pool of candidate companies among the candidates for the quote request to a minimum of three. The third and final step is to select the winning company after site visits and public Q&As, as well as competitive negotiations with the selected recommended company. Before this stage, no financial matters can be discussed. The guidelines require that if the parties fail to agree on terms, the task force enters into negotiations with its second choice, and so on.

The planned budget for the SPAC project is $275 million.

Once selected and the mandates established, the working group comes before the Municipal Commission for approval of its recommendation.

The RFQ specifications include a 2,100-seat main hall, a 300-seat flexible performance space, and a total of 165,000 square feet of building utilizing education, event, and rooftop space at the same time. inside and outside. The Van Wezel Performing Arts Hall replacement is part of The Bay Park project, a reimagining of the city-owned 53-acre site along Tamiami Trail between Arts Boulevard and the 10th Street public boat launch. street.

The redevelopment of the bay is being led by the Bay Park Conservancy in partnership with the Van Wezel Foundation – both city-approved bodies – the latter being responsible for building the SPAC. Funding for the entire park project, including SPAC, is a combination of private donations, grants, a portion of the countywide penny tax, and revenue from the Funding District. waterfront tax increases.

The task force was also briefed by Paratus Group Founder and President Andrew Klemmer and Project Manager Cortez Crosby, who guided them through the process from request for quotation to final selection.

The company was founded 25 years ago and its work is inspired by what Klemmer described as a “tremendously successful project” at the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spain. Inaugurated in 1997, it is considered one of the most important buildings of the 20th century.

“A lot of what we do is based on our success in Bilbao,” Klemmer said. “We tried to replicate that…to do the same thing that we’ve been doing over and over for 25 years. This first step is really essential to match an architect and a client. Not every architect is perfect for every job, so it’s really about finding that perfect person who can pursue your mission and do it in a smart way that will serve you well after opening.

As a consultant engaged by a city-appointed body, Paratus Group is subject to the same Sunshine laws, and all communications are public.

Paratus Group will select RFPs and prepare them for review by the working group and contact companies to answer general questions about the project within the permitted parameters, and prepare and distribute RFPs. He cannot make recommendations to the committee.

“Our job is to give you the information you need to make the decisions, not to advise you on the decisions,” Klemmer said.

The task force must make its final selection and prepare its recommendation to the city board by April 2023. All meetings are open to the public and can be viewed on the city’s website.


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Shining a light on the climate crisis through interactive performances at Livermore | New https://akademija-art.net/shining-a-light-on-the-climate-crisis-through-interactive-performances-at-livermore-new/ Tue, 01 Nov 2022 21:51:23 +0000 https://akademija-art.net/shining-a-light-on-the-climate-crisis-through-interactive-performances-at-livermore-new/ A performing arts group from Livermore kicks off their 2022 performance season. This year’s theme: the climate crisis. Shakespeare and Performing Arts Regional Company Theater has announced two new feature films as part of its second run [email protected] reading series. Presented in the form of spoken word, the programs aim to highlight the environmental changes […]]]>

A performing arts group from Livermore kicks off their 2022 performance season. This year’s theme: the climate crisis.

Shakespeare and Performing Arts Regional Company Theater has announced two new feature films as part of its second run [email protected] reading series. Presented in the form of spoken word, the programs aim to highlight the environmental changes induced by global warming in the 21st century. Both plays will be performed as live readings, script in hand and semi-staged.

Producer Art Director Lisa Tromovitch described the coin series as a combination of social justice, science awareness, and Tri-Valley community.

“The Tri-Valley includes two national labs and many companies that engage in science and engineering. So starting a series of science play readings is a way to respond directly to our unique community. “Tromovich said.

The first of the two pieces is “Two Degrees” by Tira Palmquist. The plot follows Emma Phelps, a paleoclimatologist, as she is summoned to a Senate committee meeting to testify about climate and environmental legislation.

In the piece, Emma focuses her work on the Greenland ice caps and conservation methods. Throughout her experience, Emma struggles with emotional and professional turmoil in her desire for advocacy.

The second piece will be “Basilosaurus” by Marisela Trevino Orta, recently commissioned by SPARC. His show will be the first public reading of the play, incorporating members of the public and allowing them to have their say as Orta continues to refine the script for a final version.

“The play is not just about the whale and the impact of climate change on it,” Orta said in a SPARC Theater press release. “I really want to set the story in our present time, as climate change has a regular impact on our lives in the form of extreme weather, rising sea levels and rising global temperatures.”

Orta will be in the house for the shows, actively taking feedback from audience members.

Besides the Otra commission, the theater has reserved four other additional plays by various writers. Each play is intentionally sourced from various playwrights.

“We chose to commission pieces from BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, and People of Color) artists,” Tromovitch said. “We have combined our desire to keep artists working, to reach out to our science community, and to support artists in our community.”

“Theatrical communities in general in the Bay Area are certainly very committed to aspects of social justice. When we tell stories and portray people on stage, we want to reflect the whole community, not just a segment of this one,” she added.

Due to the intimate reading style of the shows, Tromovitch explained how each performance will be unique. Plays are read aloud with minimal production, then audience members will be allowed to engage and interact with the cast, staff or playwright themselves.

“What the public will hear is something no one else will ever hear again,” she said. “You actually become part of the writing process. There may very well be individual line changes from day to day.”

Tromovitch shared what she thinks makes the two pieces work well together, as they start from scientifically opposite starting points.

“One starting point is when water was sucked out of the oceans to become the polar ice caps, and then the other piece is about a time in the future when those polar ice caps are melting again,” Tromovitch said. “They’re sort of bookends to each other with these two climate change events.”

The series will play at SPARC Studio in Livermore through November, with “Two Degrees” airing Friday through Sunday (November 4-6) and “Basilosauraus” November 18-20. Shows start at 7 p.m.

To find more information about the theater and its productions, visit sparctheater.org.

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Sharjah Art Foundation unveils inaugural season of five performances across the emirate https://akademija-art.net/sharjah-art-foundation-unveils-inaugural-season-of-five-performances-across-the-emirate/ Sun, 30 Oct 2022 08:15:00 +0000 https://akademija-art.net/sharjah-art-foundation-unveils-inaugural-season-of-five-performances-across-the-emirate/ Following the establishment of its new performance department, the Sharjah Art Foundation has announced its inaugural performance program – comprising five performative works by regional and international artists set in open spaces, public places, heritage houses and theaters in the emirate from 4 November. 2022 to January 8, 2023. Organized by performance director and principal […]]]>

Following the establishment of its new performance department, the Sharjah Art Foundation has announced its inaugural performance program – comprising five performative works by regional and international artists set in open spaces, public places, heritage houses and theaters in the emirate from 4 November. 2022 to January 8, 2023.

Organized by performance director and principal curator Tarek Abou El Fetouh, this new programme, entitled Perform Sharjah, formalizes and extends the Foundation’s commitment to supporting the creation and dissemination of performance.

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As contemporary art increasingly blurs the boundaries between disciplines, performance artists have brought together theatre, music, contemporary dance and installation in their practice. During Perform Sharjah, regional and international artists will engage audiences in their explorations of the rhythm of the city through their individual perspectives on its living urban fabric as well as its architectural and cultural heritage.

Perform Sharjah is deeply rooted in the emirate’s diverse communities, with programs that engage closely with the city and its people.

With Perform Sharjah paving the way for future performance programs, the Foundation will commission artists to create performance and site-specific works in various locations around the city, which will be presented to the public over the next few years.

Additionally, Perform Sharjah will provide participants from the UAE and the Gulf region with a wide range of learning opportunities in the field of theater and performance through workshops, lectures and educational programs conducted by artists and created with local partners including the Sharjah Theater Department and Sharjah Performing Arts. Academy.

Here are the five performances with dates and locations for the inaugural season:

Every shiny thing

The program opens with the Arabic iteration of “Every Brilliant Thing”, adapted and directed by Ahmed El Attar. The play will feature Nanda Mohamed, sitting alone on an empty stage with only minimal decor, props and music. She has the difficult task of balancing the script with the energies of the audience who are invited to participate and even improvise during the show.

November 4, 2022, Bait Obaid Al Shamsi

Automotive 9

Behind the parking lot of Al Rolla Square, one of the most vital and distinctive areas of the city, Joe Namy will present the ninth version of his sound performance “Automobile”.

Automotive, Abu Dhabi, performance by Joe Namy. Image © Radfan Alqirsh

Namy works with owners of cars equipped with exceptionally powerful bespoke audio systems that are typically used to play music at desert rallies.

He brings this practice to the center of the city, connecting the loudspeakers to create a huge stereo system, simultaneously playing field recordings collected and composed by the artist.

November 6, 2022, Rolla Park parking lot

Sharjah remotely

The award-winning theater group Rimini Protokoll will recreate a version of “Remote X”. The performance, a kind of experimental mobile research laboratory, was shown in many cities around the world. For each new edition, a unique dramatic structure is developed, based on the urban fabric of the host site.

The Sharjah iteration, titled “Remote Sharjah”, will kick off at the Sharjah Art Foundation spaces in Al Mureijah Square, where a computer-generated voice will guide participants as they navigate a sequence of carefully selected indoor and outdoor venues. . Everyone will see the places come to life, as if immersed in an imaginary film set.

This interactive performance will take place in English, Arabic, Urdu and Malayalam.

November 11, 13, 18, 20; December 9, 11, 2022; and 6, 8 January 2023, Al Mureijah Square

After All Springville: Disasters and Amusement Parks

The program resumes in December with “After All Springville: Disasters and Amusement Parks” by Miet Warlop, which mixes theater and visual arts with captivating performance works.

During the performance, viewers will witness fantastic characters with hybrid bodies (half-human, half-object) who are engaged in unpredictable, yet eerily familiar actions.

December 6 and 7, 2022, Bait Obail Al Shamsi

New creation

The season ends with Bruno Beltrão’s performance “New Creation”. Recognized internationally as an innovator of the hip hop scene, Beltrão pays close attention to the political realities of his native Brazil in order to translate them into extreme impulses of bodily energy, with an analytical understanding of music and space.

With his company Grupo de Rua, Beltrão deconstructs hip hop and explores the vocabulary of street dance and contemporary dance.

January 8, 2023, Sharjah Academy of Performing Arts

Read more: Sustainability symposium at Jameel Art Center urges return to vernacular and local

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