Performing Arts – Akademija Art http://akademija-art.net/ Thu, 04 Aug 2022 09:06:54 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://akademija-art.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-150x150.png Performing Arts – Akademija Art http://akademija-art.net/ 32 32 5 things to do this weekend, including an art exhibit at BCA and a block party at EXIT Galleries https://akademija-art.net/5-things-to-do-this-weekend-including-an-art-exhibit-at-bca-and-a-block-party-at-exit-galleries/ Thu, 04 Aug 2022 09:06:54 +0000 https://akademija-art.net/5-things-to-do-this-weekend-including-an-art-exhibit-at-bca-and-a-block-party-at-exit-galleries/ If you feel like dancing, you’re in luck this weekend. EXIT Galleries in Allston will host a party with live music from The Overhead Bins & Godcaster throughout the evening. If you’d rather watch than cut a rug, Grant Jacoby & Dancers will perform experimental choreography on Saturday in Cambridge. There is also the world […]]]>

If you feel like dancing, you’re in luck this weekend. EXIT Galleries in Allston will host a party with live music from The Overhead Bins & Godcaster throughout the evening. If you’d rather watch than cut a rug, Grant Jacoby & Dancers will perform experimental choreography on Saturday in Cambridge. There is also the world premiere of “Mommy, Are We Poor?” at the Center Moïseien des Arts. All this and more below.

‘OUTCHEA!’ at the EXIT galleries

Friday August 5

Head to Allston this weekend for a music and performing arts festival at EXIT Galleries. There will be live performances by The Overhead Bins & Godcaster, an immersive visual art installation by Sam Fish, and free drinks. The event is a celebration of DIY music – part boutique and part block party. There will be local artisan products for sale and a creative crowd. OUCHEA! is not to be missed.


From Friday 5 August to Saturday 20 August

Catch the opening weekend of playwright Richard Ravosa’s “Mommy, Are We Poor,” which follows a single mother of two as Christmas approaches. When her boss offers to help out, the family gets another chance for a happy holiday. Northeastern University drama professor Greg Allen directs the play at the Mosesian Center for the Arts in Watertown. Prior to the August 6 performance, there will be a fundraising reception for the Massachusetts Debt Relief Foundation, a local nonprofit that provides pro bono legal representation to low-income residents of the state. There will also be a paid performance on August 17.


From Saturday 6 August to Saturday 10 September

New works by artist M’Kenzy Cannon will be on display starting this weekend at the Boston Center for the Arts. This multimedia exhibition uses videos, photos and objects to create an intimate space, the home of a stranger. The objects are fantastic and emotive. Cannon’s “PLEASE LET ME IN” is a kind of spatial theater where visitors will have the opportunity to explore the play’s disorienting details and place themselves in the art. There will be a public reception and curator’s tour on August 12.

Home of the exhibition “PLEASE LET ME IN” at the BCA. (Courtesy of the artists and BCA)

Saturday August 6

This unique dance performance, part of the Dance Complex’s DIY Performance Platform series, encourages visitors to really see this. The choreography is immersive and meant to be seen up close and at 360 degrees to see every move at its most vulnerable. The dance explores melancholy, pain and grief as it transforms into armor and due to celebrate. The show is presented by Grant Jacoby & Dancers, a dance company based in New York, New Jersey and Boston. After the performances, the dance company will host a talk-back.


Sunday August 7

This Sunday, join some friends and build a miniature car at GrandTen Distilling. The distillery will provide kits with pine wood, plastic wheels, and metal axles for $5, or attendees can bring their own gear. There will be a 35-foot two-lane aluminum track and people can turn up anytime between 2-5 p.m. to join the race. Winners will be awarded in three categories: best time, top of the ladder and best looking car.

]]>
SummerFest’s “Weekend in Paris” Concerts Bring French Salon Music Traditions to La Jolla https://akademija-art.net/summerfests-weekend-in-paris-concerts-bring-french-salon-music-traditions-to-la-jolla/ Tue, 02 Aug 2022 18:00:38 +0000 https://akademija-art.net/summerfests-weekend-in-paris-concerts-bring-french-salon-music-traditions-to-la-jolla/ For many people, talking about Paris takes on a cinematic dimension – the sights, the food, the art, the music. Inon Barnatan, the 36-year-old SummerFest Music Director of the La Jolla Music Society, is no exception. His grandfather lived in the “City of Light” and Barnatan, born in Israel, often visits and performs there. “Much […]]]>

For many people, talking about Paris takes on a cinematic dimension – the sights, the food, the art, the music. Inon Barnatan, the 36-year-old SummerFest Music Director of the La Jolla Music Society, is no exception. His grandfather lived in the “City of Light” and Barnatan, born in Israel, often visits and performs there.

“Much of the romance, charm and legend of Paris – in addition to its beauty – is tied to culture,” he said. “It’s hard to think of Paris without thinking of Toulouse-Lautrec, Picasso, Chanel, the opera, the Louvre. The culture is imbued with the image of the city.

Barnatan, an acclaimed classical pianist, channeled his fascination into SummerFest’s “A Weekend in Paris” series. It will be held Friday through Sunday, August 5 through August 7, at the Baker-Baum Concert Hall at the Conrad Prebys Performing Arts Center in La Jolla.

The performances will explore France’s rich musical heritage and feature an international lineup of over a dozen artists. Among them, British pianist Dame Imogen Cooper, Dutch violinist Liza Ferschtman, Italian-Swiss pianist Francesco Piemontesi, mezzo-soprano Fleur Barron, violinist Augustin Hadelich and pianist Joyce Yang.

Barnatan originally planned a concert highlighting French music from the Belle Époque (“belle époque”) and the Années Folles (“roaring twenties”) for SummerFest 2022, which will open on July 29 and continue until Friday August 26. But he quickly realized that one was not enough.

“You can do an entire festival around Paris in just one of those times,” he said. “Sometimes it was hard to decide; I had so many choices of wonderful pieces. A weekend is much better than a night in Paris.

As one of its many free events, SummerFest will feature “Encounter: Weekend in Paris” at 2 p.m. on Thursday, August 4. Jennifer Walker, Assistant Professor of Musicology at West Virginia University, will discuss the Paris Salons in historical context.

Walker will also speak at prelude talks ahead of the August 5-7 concerts. In between, on August 6, the Trio Aestas prelude will play a composition by French composer Germaine Tailleferre.

Thriving music scene

Between the late 1800s and World War I, the famous salons of Paris were intimate gatherings of French high society.

“The fairs were organized by the elite, but they were the most inclusive and classless events,” Barnatan said. “Writers and artists have mingled with the elite. Class and gender were much less important than in other times.

The women, who generally organize the Parisian salons, become powerful figures. American sewing machine heiress Winnaretta Singer, who ran a highly influential salon, commissioned many of the now famous musical works.

French composer Juliette “Lili” Boulanger is shown around 1915, three years before her death.

(Apic/Getty Images)

Some of the composers of the time were women, including Tailleferre and Lili Boulanger. A play by Boulanger, “Nocturne”, will be performed on August 6.

A big part of this thriving music scene was Le Conservatoire de Paris, which Barnatan considers “the most important music school in history”.

Claude Debussy, Darius Milhaud, Camille Saint-Saëns and Maurice Ravel studied at the conservatory at different times. They are among the many composers whose works are presented in “A weekend in Paris”.

The August 7 concert, titled “Beg, Borrow and Steal,” focuses on the influence of the Baroque period on composers.

“They drew inspiration from many sources to create their music,” Barnatan said. “They were inspired by the great Baroque masters and their own traditions to create their masterpieces.

“It fits perfectly with the overall theme of this year’s SummerFest: ‘Under the Influence’.”

Leah Rosenthal, artistic director of the La Jolla Music Society, said she’s thrilled that SummerFest is bringing this mini-festival within the festival.

“I’m thrilled that we’re diving into this world of the Belle Epoque and the ‘Roaring Twenties’ after,” she said. “It’s a musical capsule in this era.”

A wealth of experience

This year’s SummerFest is the first since 2019 to see a truly international ensemble perform here live, a feat made more difficult by the COVID-19 pandemic. Regardless of their country of origin, the concert performers of “Week-end” share an enthusiasm for playing romantic and neo-classical music.

Barnatan hails Cooper – whom Queen Elizabeth II named a ‘Dame’ last year – as the ‘first lady of the piano in the UK’.

“She plays with great orchestras and conductors all over the world,” Barnatan said. “We both sat on a jury together for a competition in Leeds. I asked if she was coming to SummerFest and I was so excited when she said she would.

Piemontesi, another pianist who will perform on “Weekend”, plays at festivals around the world, “but audiences in San Diego don’t know him,” Barnatan said. “I wanted to bring it so they could hear it.”

“It’s great to have a festival setting to flesh out these exciting times in music. It’s one of the music I love the most,” Barnatan said. “I always say to classical audiences, ‘The more you know, the richer the experience.’ But you don’t need to know anything. You will get the Parisian feel while listening to the beautiful music.”

Video Notes

Leah Rosenthal, artistic director of the La Jolla Music Society

Leah Rosenthal, artistic director of La Jolla Music Society, says she is “delighted” that the “Weekend in Paris” series “dives into this world of the Belle Epoque and “the Roaring Twenties” after that. It is a musical capsule in this era.

(Nelvin C. Cepeda/The San Diego Union-Tribune)

Before each “Weekend in Paris” concert, the public will see a short video with Barnatan introducing the performance.

“Nine of our SummerFest concerts at Baker-Baum will have what we call ‘video program notes,'” Rosenthal said. “They are directed by Tristan Cook. An interpreter can say a few words. And Inon speaks for two to three minutes.

“Whenever an artist talks… about the music they are about to play, people’s minds open up and can better absorb and appreciate what they are about to hear. “

Most of the concerts at SummerFest’s 35 previous editions have been taped, according to Allison Boles, director of education and community programming for the Music Society.

“It’s exciting that we can use musical excerpts from our own concerts in the video lineup notes,” Boles said. “They will bring back memories of other concerts.”

“A Weekend in Paris” from SummerFest

When: 7:30 p.m. Friday August 5 and Saturday August 6 and 3 p.m. Sunday August 7

Where: Baker-Baum Concert Hall, Conrad Prebys Performing Arts Center, 7600 Fay Ave., La Jolla

Cost: $48 to $98 per gig

Information: ljms.org(858) 459-3728

]]>
Residency programs aim to expose more Madison students to the arts | local education https://akademija-art.net/residency-programs-aim-to-expose-more-madison-students-to-the-arts-local-education/ Sun, 31 Jul 2022 22:03:59 +0000 https://akademija-art.net/residency-programs-aim-to-expose-more-madison-students-to-the-arts-local-education/ PAMELA COTANT For the State Journal A music lesson run by an organization focused on young students who otherwise wouldn’t have access to lessons and instruments was ending when a boy turned to an instructor and said he wanted to play the violin. “‘Well,’ I said, ‘Do you want to keep playing now,’ because it […]]]>

PAMELA COTANT For the State Journal

A music lesson run by an organization focused on young students who otherwise wouldn’t have access to lessons and instruments was ending when a boy turned to an instructor and said he wanted to play the violin.

“‘Well,’ I said, ‘Do you want to keep playing now,’ because it was time for the class to leave the room,” said instructor Bonnie Greene.

But the second-year boy was looking further down the road.

“He said, ‘This is what I want to do when I grow up,'” Greene said.

The exchange took place during classes led by Harmony Madison last month during a residency program at Leopold Elementary School. This was part of the first year of the Summer Arts Academy operated by the Madison School District to provide learning opportunities in the visual and performing arts.

People also read…

Residency programs in grades one through five were provided through existing programs operated by Madison School and Community Recreation. While Harmony Madison was one such residency, other elementary sites featured other residency programs in dance, visual arts, and theater.






Mendeecees Cabell-Stevenson, a 4K student, plays percussion while Laurie Lang keeps time.


ANDY MANIS, FOR STATE NEWSPAPER


Expanded offerings for students in grades 6-12 have been offered at three college sites – Cherokee, O’Keeffe and Wright.

In partnership with members of the Madison community, local businesses and artists, the district seeks to provide artistic programming in the performing arts, music and digital media production, drama, theater and more .

“We particularly wanted to target access for students who were invited to the summer school, as these students need and deserve the enriching connections to school programming that the arts can provide,” said Peter Kuzma, coordinator of arts education for the Madison School District.


Madison School Board approves 3% base salary increase for staff in 5-1 vote

While the summer courses were held in the morning, the Summer Arts Academy was held in the afternoon and was free for registered students.

“It’s fun,” freshman Khloe Jones said of the violin class.

Sophomore Anyelly Castillo Salguero said she would continue to play the violin if she had another chance.







School Spotlight 3

Thanya Moreno helps second-grade student Anyelly Castillo Salguero play the violin at Leopold Elementary School.


ANDY MANIS, FOR STATE NEWSPAPER


Harmony Madison has been hired to direct the residency program at Leopold. The organization intends to offer music lessons earlier than students can start them in school and create a strong foundation for more students to successfully pursue music in school performance bands. and community leaders. He also wants to connect students to organizations that can offer performance and private lesson opportunities beyond what schools can offer.

Greene is the founder of the Music Makers program, a non-profit organization designed to provide high quality private music education to mostly low-income children, which is now operated by the Wisconsin Youth Symphony Orchestras. Music Makers was invited to be part of the residency program with the Madison Conservatory. The residency was a chance for organizations, which are set up to provide private lessons and instruments, to connect with students.

Ria Hodgson, director of WYSO Music Makers, taught during the residency. His organization offers private lessons and group lessons with grants available. She said a parent had already reached out to arrange bass lessons for her child.


Some schools hit hard by COVID-19 are making few changes for the new year

During the two-week Harmony Madison residency, students had three daily 45-minute sessions, except for two excursion days. They learned to play the violin, studied music history by learning the diddley bow, explored world rhythms on buckets and African drums, and explored jazz improvisation, melody, harmony and rhythm with the group singing.

Harmony Madison teachers — Greene, Laurie Lang and Chris Wagoner — were joined by other colleagues and volunteers.

The residency was the first program offered by the organization, which is officially called Harmony Madison of Community Organizations Promoting the Arts, or COPA. Steve Sveum is the director. Some of the new opportunities could be at the facility currently used by COPA until a new one is built. Part of the motivation and approach is driven by research into the effectiveness of studying music for brain development that helps with learning reading and math, Greene said.

“Harmony Madison’s mission is to provide music lessons and performance opportunities to young people in the Madison area,” Greene said. “It’s access to the arts.”

]]>
Teenage Musicals Inc. celebrates 60 years https://akademija-art.net/teenage-musicals-inc-celebrates-60-years/ Sat, 30 Jul 2022 09:06:23 +0000 https://akademija-art.net/teenage-musicals-inc-celebrates-60-years/ For decades, Midland-area teens have spent their summer vacations staging musicals with Teenage Musicals Inc. (TMI). In many cases, their experiences have inspired them long after the final curtain has fallen. TMI celebrates 60 years of musical theater experiences for students aged 13-23. For the love of theater TMI began in 1962, when Midland students, […]]]>

For decades, Midland-area teens have spent their summer vacations staging musicals with Teenage Musicals Inc. (TMI). In many cases, their experiences have inspired them long after the final curtain has fallen.

TMI celebrates 60 years of musical theater experiences for students aged 13-23.

For the love of theater

TMI began in 1962, when Midland students, voice and music teacher Betty Hath asked him to create a summer musical. At the time, children and teenagers had very few opportunities to act in plays.

Betty and her husband, Gerald, accommodated the children’s wishes and went to work on their first show, “I’ll Never Let You Go,” performing in the auditorium of the Grace A. Dow Memorial Library. About 30 students participated that first year, working behind the scenes or on stage. The group grew to eventually accommodate over 100 students.

Through TMI, teens and young adults are involved in nearly every aspect of directing a musical.


In the summer of 1999, former Midlander Micah Young landed a role in the production of TMI’s “Babes in Arms”. He enjoyed learning different skills, participating in fundraisers, and spending time with other TMI members after rehearsals and performances.

“That communal environment is so important when you’re a teenager,” Young said.

In 2002, Young had the chance to direct a rehearsal for “The Wizard of Oz” under Jim Hohmeyer, which Young described as a “great moment”. Young went on to lead several other TMI shows and served as student board president.

“That experience prepared me a lot,” Young said. “Conducting is one of those things you learn by doing.”

TMI left Young feeling empowered to pursue a career in the performing arts. He has since worked in 11 Broadway shows; he just started as a backup pianist with the Broadway production of “The Music Man,” the same show TMI is presenting this year.

“Midland has a lot of resources,” he said. “To have TMI are proven people doing the arts for a living. It opens your mind to “I can do this”.

Growing up in Bay City, Claudia Marsh had no summer theater opportunities. She planned to study acting in college but lacked confidence in her acting abilities. In 2008, her sister learned that TMI was holding auditions for “Oklahoma!” and encouraged Marsh to try. Although hesitant, Marsh decides on a whim to audition and lands a role in the set.

“It was the best decision I could have made,” she said.

She credits team members Billy Anderson, Adam Gardner-Northrop and Kelli Jolly for helping her realize her talent and build her confidence. Marsh continued to perform on TMI shows including “Beauty and the Beast”, “Cats”, and “Kiss Me Kate”. In addition to performing on stage, Marsh was a student representative on the TMI board.

Marsh, who now resides in Midland, went on to study musical theater with a concentration in acting and directing at Central Michigan University. She teaches middle school drama classes, directs high school productions in Bay City, and continues to audition for regional shows. She is also Chair of the Board of the Midland Center for the Arts.

“I think every student can have their own experience,” Marsh said. “Mine was to point out to people that I could be a leader and to encourage me.”

Building friendships one summer at a time

A small team of adults assists the teens in the weeks leading up to TMI shows.

Former Midlander Pennye Padgett has served on TMI’s board and as a choreographer for 16 shows, spanning from 1973’s ‘Bye Bye Birdie’ to 2018’s ‘The Little Mermaid’.

“For me, the biggest star in the world was Betty Hath,” Padgett said. “She was adorable in real life and on stage. It was so exciting for me and my two daughters to perform for Betty and Gerry Hath.

After helping out at a few shows in the 1970s, Padgett left the state for a while. In 1993, director Kay Collison invited her back to Midland to choreograph “Carousel”. Seeing the smiling faces of the children gathered in the theater, Padgett was fully engaged.

“It’s a family. The older kids took care of the younger ones,” Padgett said. “They helped them and taught them the dances.”

Padgett appreciated how hard the students worked for the shows, saying that in the end, they taught adults more than adults could teach them. She received notes from former TMI members saying how much the program has meant to them and inspired them over the years.

“It’s the most rewarding thing for me,” she said. “We pass it on every summer.”

Peter Conarty, from Midland, taught speech and drama in Midland public schools in the 1970s. It was through his relationship with Gerald Hath that he became involved with TMI.

“I became a member of the TMI board and before I knew it, I was running shows,” Conarty said. “It was just in my domain.”

Conarty has directed seven TMI shows, but one of his favorites was “Guys and Dolls” in 1975. Not only was this his first time directing TMI, but he also has fond memories of building the sets with students. He explained how the program brought out his enthusiasm and energy for acting.

Conarty observed how TMI provided students with the opportunity to not only showcase their talents, but also to meet others in the area. To this day, Conarty remains in contact with former TMI members, receiving occasional Christmas emails and cards.

“It’s nice to be called back after all these years,” Conarty said. “In all the years I’ve conducted, the students were wonderful. They really went out of their way for the shows.

The legacy lives on

Students continued to benefit from TMI even after the end of a particular summer. As early as the 1970s, TMI provided theater scholarships — funded by show profits — to Midland College students who wanted to further their education in the performing arts. United Steelworkers Local 12075 is currently offering an annual scholarship worth $5,000 to a TMI student who demonstrates commitment to the community.

Betty Hath passed away in 2016 and Gerald Hath passed away in 2018, but their legacy lives on in the lives they touched.

For Marsh, TMI impacted her life in multiple ways, and she still maintains friendships made during her time with the program. She can’t imagine what her life would be like without her experience with TMI.

“I’m so grateful to have been able to meet Gerry and Betty Hath,” Marsh said. “These are incredible people who have made a difference in the lives of children 60 years later.”

Padgett discussed how TMI instills valuable lessons in younger generations, including the value of hard work, public speaking, relationships and following the rules.

“I hope the community will continue to support TMI,” Padgett said. “There is so much to gain in the arts.”

]]>
Mikko Haggott Henson is remembered for bringing Japanese culture to the United States https://akademija-art.net/mikko-haggott-henson-is-remembered-for-bringing-japanese-culture-to-the-united-states/ Thu, 28 Jul 2022 17:04:55 +0000 https://akademija-art.net/mikko-haggott-henson-is-remembered-for-bringing-japanese-culture-to-the-united-states/ Mikko Haggott Henson of Redondo Beach, who dedicated her life to serving as a bridge between the United States and Japan, died on June 20. She was 85 years old. Born in Tokyo in February 1937, she was the youngest daughter of Shiro Arimoto, founder of the Shibaura Institute of Technology in Tokyo. Mikko Hagott […]]]>

Mikko Haggott Henson of Redondo Beach, who dedicated her life to serving as a bridge between the United States and Japan, died on June 20. She was 85 years old.

Born in Tokyo in February 1937, she was the youngest daughter of Shiro Arimoto, founder of the Shibaura Institute of Technology in Tokyo.

Mikko Hagott Henson

In 1962, Henson attended a two-week English immersion program at Karuizawa. Ben Haggott, a resident of Torrance, was the instructor. He sponsored her to come to the United States to attend school in 1964. Three years later, they were married.

Shortly after settling in Torrance, Henson began her quest to preserve flowers and established herself as an artist. His work, “The Art of Preserving Flowers”, has been exhibited in many places, including the Los Angeles County Natural Museum (1968) and the LA County Botanic Gardens. His work also made headlines, notably on Channel 7 (1975) and in newspapers such as The Los Angeles Times (1969) and The daily breeze (1974).

In the 1960s, many Japanese companies began to establish offices in the Torrance area, resulting in an influx of Japanese families. Growing up in Japan during World War II, Henson realized that a number of misconceptions existed between the two countries and saw the need to increase cultural awareness in the hope that through understanding mutual, people could live in harmony. As such, she began volunteering in the community to introduce Japanese culture, visiting elementary schools to present lectures to students.

She established the Japanese language books section at the Torrance Library in 1975. In 1980, in conjunction with the Torrance Unified School District and the City of Torrance, Henson organized a 10-day cross-cultural education event for all fourth grade students. Through her efforts, she was recognized as Torrance’s “Volunteer of the Year” by the National Recreation & Park Association in 1980.

Mikko Haggott Henson brought Japanese performing arts to the United States and helped establish the Torrance-Kashiwa sister city program.

In 1973, Henson helped establish a sister city relationship between Torrance and Kashiwa in Chiba Prefecture. She founded the Torrance Sister City Association, became its first president in 1976, and set up many annual programs such as Bunka-Sai, a student exchange, and sending an English teacher to Kashiwa, which continues to this day. Under her leadership from 1976 to 1990, the Torrance Sister City Association received eight awards from Sister Cities International and is considered a model sister city in the United States.

Henson has received several awards over the years in recognition of her community volunteer efforts, including South Bay YWCA Woman of the Year in 1986, Woman in the History of Torrance in 1988, the Sidney Jared Torrance Award (the highest honor in the City) in 2002, and the Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce and Japanese Businessmen’s Association Friendship Awards in 2009.

From 1978 to 1984, she worked as a curriculum associate in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction at USC and as a Bilingual and Bicultural Teacher Certification Test Evaluator.

From 1980 to 1982, Henson worked with UCLA’s Department of Fine Arts on a special summer project to bring notable masters of classical dance, music, and theater from Japan. She even took hayashi (classical percussion) lessons herself, taught by Grand Master Katada Kisaku, designated a national treasure of Japan. This art form had died out in the United States after the war and she wanted to revive it in Southern California.

After many years of training, Henson became a natori and was given the name Katada Kikusa by the grandmaster in 1986. She performed, lectured, and taught at many places, including the Japanese American Cultural and Community Center in Little Tokyo, and has been recognized as a Master Artist by the California Arts Council. She received the Torrance Fine Arts Awards in 1987.

Mikko Haggott Henson playing the kotsuzumi, a small hand drum.

In 1992, she founded a non-profit organization called Japanese Traditional Performing Arts Organization (www.JTPAO.org) to introduce, promote and preserve traditional Japanese cultural arts in the United States. As president of JTPAO and as a musician, Henson has received numerous grants and lectured at many schools. She has also produced performing arts programs at the Aratani Theater in Little Tokyo and the Armstrong Theater in Torrance, and has invited a number of renowned artists from Japan.

Henson became involved with the Los Angeles Olympic Committee in 1984 and the Atlanta Olympic Committee in 1996 as a Japanese language specialist and advisor. She also volunteered at both Olympic events.

In 1988 Henson became a contract interpreter for the US State Department. In this capacity, accompanied Japanese politicians and other personalities visiting the United States

Her organizational skills led her to be the project director of many events such as “Tomihiro in LA”, a 10-day art exhibition in 2001. Tomihiro Hoshino is a famous oral artist and poet in Japan. Henson also worked as project director of the 100e anniversary celebration of the Federation of Japanese American Churches in Southern California, which took place in 2013. Both events took two years to plan.

Starting in 2007, Henson began showing Japanese historical films made by Gendai Production in Los Angeles, such as “Fudeko and Angel’s Piano”, “Thank You, Daddy Ishii”, “Before the Dawn”, and “Nostalgic for Homeland”. . All proceeds from this film project were donated to charities such as Little Tokyo Service Center, Keiro Nursing Home, a special education school in Torrance, and the Japanese American Church Federation of Southern California.

In 2010, Henson established the Arimoto Memorial Scholarship Endowment at UC Irvine to honor his father and encourage young Japanese people to study in California. It has supported more than 20 students with scholarships that enabled them to participate in a three-month study program at UCI.

In 2016, Henson published a book, “Rokuichi and Yasuko’s Shonien”, in Japan. She spent ten years researching the history of Japanese immigrants in Los Angeles and the story of Joy Kusumoto and her adopted daughter, Grace Kusumoto, who established a home for orphans 100 years ago in Los Angeles. Angeles and 80 years ago in China with the support of the Southern California Japanese Community. She had given talks whenever possible to present the story of this inspiring person.

In 2017, her lifelong dedication to fostering Japanese-American relations was recognized when she was named Woman of the Year by the Japanese American Citizens League (JACL) and the Japanese Woman’s Society of Southern California.

Henson became a naturalized citizen in 1977, and her husband Ben Haggott, vice president of the Metropolitan Water District, died in 1982. She remarried in 1985 to a veterinarian, Barry J. Henson, who died in 2020.

At the time of his death, Henson was working on the 50e anniversary of the Torrance-Kashiwa sister city program, which will be celebrated in 2023.

Survivors include: older sister, Chieko Endo; nieces, Atsuko Ogawa and Keiko Wada; nephew, Tomohiko Endo; nephews, Tatsuo Inamasu and Fumio Inamasu; niece, Mikako Inamasu; nieces, Eriko Arimoto and Yumiko Arimoto; sister-in-law, Noriko Arimoto; nieces, Konomi Yagi, Kurumi Arimoto and Megumi Arimoto; former sister-in-law, Yoko Arimoto; stepsons, Toran Henson and Vincent Henson; daughter-in-law, Andrea Henson; sister-in-law, Kendra Juliet Sponsel; daughter-in-law, Sharynne Klein; step-granddaughter, Kaylynn Klein Garland.

]]>
Cuisine, country music and more at Lafayette Rooms https://akademija-art.net/cuisine-country-music-and-more-at-lafayette-rooms/ Tue, 26 Jul 2022 17:15:09 +0000 https://akademija-art.net/cuisine-country-music-and-more-at-lafayette-rooms/ LAFAYETTE, Ind. – Fans of Christmas-Motown blues, country music and even “MasterChef” all have something to look forward to at the Long Center for Performing Arts and its entertainment partners this season. For country music fans, 2014 New Artist of the Year winner for the Academy of Country Music Awards, Justin Moore, will perform at […]]]>

LAFAYETTE, Ind. – Fans of Christmas-Motown blues, country music and even “MasterChef” all have something to look forward to at the Long Center for Performing Arts and its entertainment partners this season.

For country music fans, 2014 New Artist of the Year winner for the Academy of Country Music Awards, Justin Moore, will perform at 7:30 p.m. on September 2 at Loeb Stadium. Fans will recognize Moore’s hit songs such as “With a Woman You Love”, “We Didn’t Have Much” and “The Ones That Didn’t Make it Back Home”.

Moore’s show is sponsored by the Long Center. Tickets are available on the Long Center website.

Also in September, “MasterChef Junior Live!” will visit the Long Center.

This stage production is similar to TV’s “Junior,” but messier and more interactive, according to Molly Leighninger, one of the star chefs who placed fourth in season eight of “MasterChef Junior.”

Molly Leighninger (left) on season eight of MasterChef Junior.

“There are going to be challenges, there are going to be cooking demonstrations,” Leighninger previously told the Journal & Courier. “And I think it’s going to be a lot of fun, and I’m really excited.”

VIP experiences with behind-the-scenes encounters are available on the Long Center website.

“MasterChef Junior live!” will visit the Long Center at 7 p.m. September 23. Tickets are $39 or $65 plus fees and are available on the venue’s website.

]]> An overview of Wachholz College Center https://akademija-art.net/an-overview-of-wachholz-college-center/ Sat, 23 Jul 2022 07:00:18 +0000 https://akademija-art.net/an-overview-of-wachholz-college-center/ Flathead Valley Community College and the community of Flathead Valley are on the edge of their seats as finishing touches are put on the expansive Paul D. Wachholz College Center, the new performing arts and activity center at the cutting edge of college technology. The Center’s website, wachholzcollegecenter.org, went live last week and tickets for […]]]>

Flathead Valley Community College and the community of Flathead Valley are on the edge of their seats as finishing touches are put on the expansive Paul D. Wachholz College Center, the new performing arts and activity center at the cutting edge of college technology.

The Center’s website, wachholzcollegecenter.org, went live last week and tickets for the first performances and programs went on sale July 22.

It’s the culmination of a construction project that began in April 2020 and the start of an evolution of cultural arts opportunities for the Flathead Valley and the entire Northwest, said Matt Laughlin, director of the College Center.

“It’s an exciting time for College Center,” said Laughlin, who served as production manager and then manager of Seattle’s prestigious Benaroya Hall for 14 years.

“All the work we’ve put into creating this lineup of freshman shows, curated for our local and regional audiences, is finally live and ready for everyone to see,” he said. “Excitement is building towards our opening later this fall.”

Initial funding for the project came from a $4 million gift from longtime Flathead businessman and realtor Paul D. Wachholz. The FVCC board had voted unanimously to approve a $25,670,866 offer in April 2020 from Swank Enterprises with a built-in contingency. Construction began shortly thereafter.

Funding for the building comes primarily from donor support – around $22 million to date. Even with rising construction costs, so far the project has been on budget. Although the operating cost plan is not finalized, these costs will likely be covered by future revenues.

In mid-October, the FVCC is planning community engagement activities to showcase the new facility.

“We would like to do free tours, open houses and possibly local artist showcases,” Laughlin said while guiding Inter Lake on a tour of the center.

The 58,000 square foot facility was built with cutting-edge and dynamic architectural plans designed by Cushing Terrell Architects. Laughlin said it will serve the community and students for many years as a regional center for arts and entertainment, as well as a hub for sporting events, client events and trade shows.

The property’s main entrance opens into the spacious Jane A. Karas Ballroom (named after the current FVCC President), which serves as the link between the Stinson Family Event Center and McClaren Hall, a 1,014-seat performing arts center designed with advanced acoustics. and flexibility to host concerts, conferences, dance performances and musical theater productions. The auditorium has approximately 740 seats on the ground floor and 274 on the balcony, with boxes on both levels.

“You get the feeling how grand it is, but also how intimate it’s going to be,” Laughlin said.

The performance hall features a spacious stage supported by a 50ft wall, an orchestra pit that can be converted to more seats or more stage as needed, a huge projection screen, a flight system and a curtain stage for dance and theater productions. The hall is complete with a loading dock, plenty of storage and green spaces.

McClaren Hall will host the Glacier Symphony, which celebrates its 40th season this year. The first performance of the symphony will be Beethoven’s “Ode to Joy” on November 19 and 20.

The center also includes the Wanda Hollensteiner Art Gallery to host rotating art exhibitions for professional and student artists, the Swank Recital Hall for smaller, intimate ensembles or functions, and a variety of classrooms for music education and seven practice rooms to enhance the FVCC music department. , including a keyboard classroom whose windows echo the design of piano keys.

On the other side of the WCC is the Stinson Family Event Center. It houses a yoga and Pilates studio, locker rooms, showers, a fitness center and a full-size basketball and volleyball court – space that can be used to host trade shows, events private and conferences for about 400 people. The gym space will lend itself to future student events and continuing education programs, as well as FVCC Foundation events and sit-down dinners.

“There’s also a well-integrated sound system in this space, so we can easily open up a stage with a music stand and have a speaker here,” Laughlin said.

McClaren Hall, which is partially below ground level, and the Stinson Event Center at ground level, are designed so that events can occur simultaneously without interruption.

The Jane A. Karas Gymnasium and Ballroom open to an east-facing courtyard and patio, as well as the outdoor O’Shaughnessy Amphitheater, terraced lawn, soon-to-be-developed performance space with a natural backdrop of magnificent mountain views.

“One thing that’s really good is that they’ve delivered enough power here that we can have performances in the summer months,” Laughlin said. “We are planning to put cocktail tables on the patio space and people are watching from here too. It’s quite grand.

Laughlin said the college eventually hopes to incorporate Broadway-style musicals and larger productions.

“This is just the beginning,” he said.

“I have always seen this place as a symbol of a great door that opens and allows more of the community to enter the campus,” he continued. “The college already has a good connection with the majority of the community but, for those who are unfamiliar, the hope is to get a lot more people to see what is happening and maybe catch a show. what they want to see. We are here to serve everyone and build a fuller and stronger calendar of family, educational and cultural arts events.

Photo

Photo

Photo

Photo

]]>
Pulitzer Prize-winning tragicomedy ‘August: Osage County’ arrives at Tritico Theater – Reuters https://akademija-art.net/pulitzer-prize-winning-tragicomedy-august-osage-county-arrives-at-tritico-theater-reuters/ Thu, 21 Jul 2022 17:56:51 +0000 https://akademija-art.net/pulitzer-prize-winning-tragicomedy-august-osage-county-arrives-at-tritico-theater-reuters/ An explosive confrontation scene is repeated for “August: Osage County”. (Special for the American press) The theatrical production “August: Osage County” will be performed July 27-31 at McNeese State University’s Tritico Theater. “August: Osage County” is a tragicomedy written by playwright Tracy Letts in 2007. It explores the complex relationships and situations of a family […]]]>

The theatrical production “August: Osage County” will be performed July 27-31 at McNeese State University’s Tritico Theater.

“August: Osage County” is a tragicomedy written by playwright Tracy Letts in 2007. It explores the complex relationships and situations of a family stricken by tragedy.

According to Dr. Brook Akya Hanemann, director of Banners at McNeese, this play is a Pulitzer Prize-winning production that has been considered “one of the most exciting American plays to come out in the last two decades.”

“It fearlessly touches on some of the most hidden things in America, which mostly revolve around the intricacies of family dysfunctions and family relationships. It’s all really centered around the Weston family as they deal with some pretty serious issues.

The play, while heavy with drama, is also “funny biting.”

“It goes to the throat and makes the stomach laugh,” Hanemann said. “The best way for me to describe this piece is that it’s a real roller coaster.”

This marks the first time “August: Osage County” has been produced in southwest Louisiana. Hanemann attributes this both to the play’s mature intensity and the complexity of its production.

“It’s a massive undertaking,” she said. “It’s a piece that takes place on a 3-storey stage. It’s extremely complex.

Hanemann explained that most plays have “single-column” dialogue, in which there is only one on-stage conversation. However, this production features “three-column” dialogue. This means that at certain points in the game, three conversations will take place simultaneously.

“There are 12 people speaking on stage in different conversations,” she said. “Conversations loop and intertwine with each other, and happen across the room. It’s a big challenge for the actors, but it’s wonderful to see on stage.

“It’s a particularly rich piece because Letts creates such specific and real characters.”

This piece is intended for an informed public and “not for sensitive souls”. Hanemann said the material is very adult and you shouldn’t bring your kids to see it.

The director of this production is Rus Blackwell. Blackwell has over 81 film and television credits and has starred alongside actors including Cate Blanchett, Brad Pitt, Charlize Theron and Paul Rudd.

He also trained at the famous New York theater school Circle and the Square.

“To have him here, it’s really hard to express what a huge blessing and gift it is,” Hanemann said.

The cast is equally impressive. “The cast is a mix of our community favorite actors from all of our local theaters and the crew is the best Lake Charles has to offer.”

Hanemann, Clay Herbert, Mark Hebert, Leslie Israel, Greg Leute, Paula McCain, Amber Netherland, Heather Partin, Randy Partin, Jonathan Richards, Dan Sadler, Kenzi Whitman and Bacot Wright will all be on stage.

This production is an impressive collaboration between Banners at McNeese, ACTS Theatre, Lake Charles Little Theater and the WA and McNeese’s Dorothy Hanna Department of Performing Arts have collaborated to bring this production to life on the McNeese Stage.

Hanemann explained that a collaboration as large and complex as this had not happened in Lake Charles before.

“A lot of times actors and designers are very isolated in their own theater…one of the amazing things that’s happened since the pandemic and the disasters is that people are starting to share resources. This is an incredibly creative collaboration that happens with people who have never worked together before.

“I think it’s going to really affect our theater community going forward.”

For Hanemann, customers will get their money’s worth just from seeing the decor. The set was built by a group of engineers and ex-military personnel who “live and breathe theatre”.

“They put together one of the most powerful sets I’ve seen as a theater practitioner.”

McNeese and Sowela students enjoy free admission with a valid student ID. General admission tickets are $20 and can be purchased online at www.banners.org. Tickets can also be purchased in the theater lobby.

Performances from July 27 to 30 will begin at 7 p.m. The performance on Sunday, July 31 will begin at 2 p.m.

For more information, visit www.banners.org or call 337.475.5123.

]]>
Henry Rollins will appear at the Fayetteville Public Library on August 12 https://akademija-art.net/henry-rollins-will-appear-at-the-fayetteville-public-library-on-august-12/ Tue, 19 Jul 2022 17:37:14 +0000 https://akademija-art.net/henry-rollins-will-appear-at-the-fayetteville-public-library-on-august-12/ Henry Rollins/Courtesy Musician, actor, author and punk rock legend Henry Rollins will appear at the Fayetteville Public Library next month. Rollins will take part in a lively discussion in the library’s new performing arts space at 6 p.m. on Friday, August 12. From the event description: Our Innovation Speakers series kicks off with someone who’s […]]]>

Henry Rollins/Courtesy

Musician, actor, author and punk rock legend Henry Rollins will appear at the Fayetteville Public Library next month.

Rollins will take part in a lively discussion in the library’s new performing arts space at 6 p.m. on Friday, August 12.

From the event description:

Our Innovation Speakers series kicks off with someone who’s done it all: music, film, podcasting, writing, spoken word and more. In this hour-long moderated conversation with punk rock legend, Henry Rollins, we’ll explore topics related to free speech, censorship, public libraries, and technology. While most of us know Henry from his work in the arts, his insightful thoughts on education, democracy, and free speech are sure to leave us with plenty to ponder.

AQ/A with Rollins and book signing will follow the conversation.

Rollins is known for his music as the frontman of punk bands Black Flag and Henry Rollins Band. These days, he’s widely seen as a modern Renaissance man with his recent work as an actor, author, DJ, voice-over artist, and TV show host, among other interests.

Doors will open for Rollins’ Fayetteville Public Library appearance at 5:30 p.m., and admission will be available on a first-come, first-served basis. No registration is required. The capacity of the new Library Performing Arts Center is 650 people.

For a little more information about the event, visit faylib.org.


Newscast

The latest headlines from The Fayetteville Flyer, delivered straight to your inbox.

]]>
Musical ‘Curtains’ opens July 22 at Center for Performing Arts in Rhinebeck – Daily Freeman https://akademija-art.net/musical-curtains-opens-july-22-at-center-for-performing-arts-in-rhinebeck-daily-freeman/ Sun, 17 Jul 2022 23:59:46 +0000 https://akademija-art.net/musical-curtains-opens-july-22-at-center-for-performing-arts-in-rhinebeck-daily-freeman/ RHINEBECK — The musical “Curtains,” a presentation from Up In One Productions, opens for a run of 12 performances Friday, July 22 at 8 p.m. at the Center for Performing Arts, 661 State Route 308. “Curtains” tells the story of an out-of-town opening for a new musical, “Robbin Hood,” in Boston in 1959. During her […]]]>

RHINEBECK — The musical “Curtains,” a presentation from Up In One Productions, opens for a run of 12 performances Friday, July 22 at 8 p.m. at the Center for Performing Arts, 661 State Route 308.

“Curtains” tells the story of an out-of-town opening for a new musical, “Robbin Hood,” in Boston in 1959. During her curtain call, the fading movie star and leading Extremely unpleasant and talentless lady Jessica Cranshaw is mysteriously murdered on stage. . The entire cast and crew become suspicious.

Enter a local detective, who happens to be a musical theater enthusiast, and the fun ensues. With a rousing score, dazzling dance numbers, witty script, and colorful characters, “Curtains” is a hilarious musical comedy of classic crime riddles. The Broadway production, starring former “Fraiser” and “Spamalot” star David Hyde Pierce, earned eight Tony nominations in 2007, including Best Musical and 10 Drama Desk Award nominations, winning the exceptional book of a musical.

“Curtains” features a score by mighty Broadway composers John Kander and Fred Ebb (“Chicago,” “Cabaret”), book by Rupert Holmes, directed and choreographed by Thomas Netter and musical direction by Matthew Woolever.

The production includes Duane Olson, Nicole Tarcza, Peter Kiewra, Rachel Karashay, Emily Woolever, Terrance Boyer, Amy La Blanc, Kandy Harris, Amber McCarthy, Orey Lopez, Michael Britt, David Foster, Justin Doro and Elaine Young. Also in the cast are Douglas Woolever, Michael Clark, Cedric James, Abby Ressa, Michael Risio, Daniel DelPriore, Ben Simonetty, Janelle Liscombe, Mia DeYoung, Sauliss Martinez, Jalen Carr, Mary Kate Barnett and Michael
Brunetti.

“Curtains” runs until Sunday, August 14. Performances are Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 3 p.m.

Tickets are $25. They can be purchased online at centerforperformingarts.org. Tickets can also be purchased at the center box office by calling (845) 876-3080 Wednesday through Friday from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

From July 22, the center will no longer require proof of vaccination and masks will be optional, but are strongly encouraged for members of the public.

]]>