Aart Activities – Akademija Art http://akademija-art.net/ Fri, 08 Oct 2021 10:23:10 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://akademija-art.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-150x150.png Aart Activities – Akademija Art http://akademija-art.net/ 32 32 Design Features to Consider for an Age-Friendly Home, Latest Shopping News https://akademija-art.net/design-features-to-consider-for-an-age-friendly-home-latest-shopping-news/ https://akademija-art.net/design-features-to-consider-for-an-age-friendly-home-latest-shopping-news/#respond Thu, 07 Oct 2021 22:00:00 +0000 https://akademija-art.net/design-features-to-consider-for-an-age-friendly-home-latest-shopping-news/ Whether you are living with seniors or helping elderly parents modernize a space, their home decor may need to be altered to meet their needs and comfort. Many active seniors value independence. They need to be able to carry out their activities – from household chores to maintenance – with ease and simplicity. Here are […]]]>

Whether you are living with seniors or helping elderly parents modernize a space, their home decor may need to be altered to meet their needs and comfort.

Many active seniors value independence. They need to be able to carry out their activities – from household chores to maintenance – with ease and simplicity.

Here are some design and furniture ideas for creating a senior-friendly home:

Keep the ground level

Raised floors like thresholds and steps can be a tripping hazard.

Mr. Ivan Lin, interior designer and director of Aart Boxx Interior, said, “Keep the ground as level as possible and avoid curbs or raised platforms. If a floor of different heights is required, consider a ramp instead. “

This is especially useful if there is someone at home who needs a wheelchair.

Consider non-slip floor tiles or treatments

Tiles like marble and polished stone floors can look great, but they often don’t provide enough grip, which can lead to slips and falls. Especially in the bathroom and kitchen, non-slip tiles should ideally be installed.

Mr. Lin said, “Even so, rough tiles can be slippery when they come in contact with soap and water. Homeowners may consider applying a nano-slip treatment, a solution that increases friction even. when the soil is wet or soapy.

“However, it should be reapplied every two or three years.”

Install guardrails or grab bars

At the same time, consider installing rails in the bathroom for additional support. These are also useful in driveways and if your home has stairs or steps.

Bathrooms can be fitted with shower benches or chairs for a more comfortable and safer showering experience.

Watch out for sharp edges

Not only should the placement of furniture not interfere with the movement of the elderly, but also take note of objects with sharp edges.

Compact, rounded furniture creates more space for movement and is less dangerous.

Avoid loose rugs

Rugs and carpets are soft and comfortable underfoot, but can also contribute to the risk of falling if they are loose or have curled edges. If the senior resident prefers to have them, add non-slip carpet pads to keep them in place.

Adequate lighting

Aging is often accompanied by changes in vision and eye problems. Sufficient and even distribution of ambient lighting without glare is crucial – think of brighter, cooler lights rather than subdued yellow lights.

Targeted lighting inside cabinets or in functional areas such as countertops can be helpful in easily locating items and preventing accidents.

Such lights can be easier on the eyes of an elderly person if the intensity and direction are adjustable.

In addition, light switches should be placed within reach (or an arm’s length) from the entrance.

Avoid clutter and create accessible storage

Clutter around the house increases the risk of hitting objects and requires more time to search for objects. While you want enough storage, keep it accessible. Low cabinets with drawers and long wall cabinets make it easy to retrieve items without having to stretch or climb on a stool.

Choose furniture with height and support

When it comes to chairs, sofas, and bed frames, choose ones that are high enough for older people to get up or sit down easily.

Chairs and armchairs should ideally have a back high enough to provide lumbar support – avoid those with uncomfortable straight backs.

A footrest is also great for supporting the feet to improve blood circulation.

Replace door handles

For aging adults with arthritis, doorknobs can literally be a pain. Replace them with levers to make it easier for seniors.

This article first appeared in The Singapore Women’s Weekly (www.womensweekly.com.sg).


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Let’s raise the flag to celebrate the anniversary of the SDGs! | Information https://akademija-art.net/lets-raise-the-flag-to-celebrate-the-anniversary-of-the-sdgs-information/ https://akademija-art.net/lets-raise-the-flag-to-celebrate-the-anniversary-of-the-sdgs-information/#respond Fri, 24 Sep 2021 04:07:30 +0000 https://akademija-art.net/lets-raise-the-flag-to-celebrate-the-anniversary-of-the-sdgs-information/ News article | 23-09-2021 | 09:04 This year we celebrate the 6e anniversary of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Former UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon dubbed the SDGs the “to-do list for people and the planet” and we can only agree! Sustainable development is at the heart of our work at the Embassy. At Twitter We […]]]>

News article | 23-09-2021 | 09:04

This year we celebrate the 6e anniversary of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Former UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon dubbed the SDGs the “to-do list for people and the planet” and we can only agree! Sustainable development is at the heart of our work at the Embassy. At Twitter We raised the digital SDG flag to celebrate the anniversary of the SDGs and in this article we explain how we strive to achieve these goals on a daily basis. While we have only highlighted a few of the SDGs for this post, all 17 goals are important for a future-proof world.

SDG 2: Zero hunger represented by employee Li Huan

Li Huan, agricultural advisor:

“The world’s population is expected to increase by 2 billion by 2050. To feed this growing population, the agricultural industry will need to produce 70% more food while only being able to use 5% more land. This, coupled with increasing environmental and regulatory pressures, presents a huge challenge for the agricultural industry. Since most of the land suitable for agriculture is already cultivated, this growth must come from higher yields. I am proud to be part of an agricultural network that provides solutions to the problems of feeding the world in a more sustainable way, contributing to SDG 2: Zero Hunger.

SDG 5: Gender equality represented by employee Terence

Terence, Second Secretary Political Affairs:

“Equal rights for women and girls is an integral part of Dutch foreign policy and is one of the areas of intervention of the Embassy in Malaysia in the area of ​​human rights. Gender equality is not only a goal in itself, it is also widely seen as a means to solve societal problems. Therefore, we continue to support various initiatives that contribute to SDG 5 in Malaysia and mainstream this message into a wide range of Embassy activities.

SDG 6: Drinking water and sanitation represented by employee Jasmine

Jasmine, Senior Economic Officer, Water and Waste Management:

“Too much, too little and too much dirty water are global problems that almost all countries face. The pressure on the environment is increasing and therefore we must work together for a safe water future for all. To achieve this, I facilitate the exchange of knowledge on water management between the Netherlands and Malaysia, thus contributing to SDG 6: clean water and sanitation. “

SDG 9: Industry, innovation and infrastructure represented by employee Machiel

Machiel, Deputy head of the economic section:

“We are studying opportunities for smart industrial cooperation between Malaysia and the Netherlands. Malaysia is making progress in digitizing its economy. Dutch companies provide innovative solutions that can make production chains more efficient, contributing to SDG 9: industry, innovation and infrastructure. “

SDG 13: Climate action represented by employee Berbel

Berbel, Communication and public diplomacy officer:

“Part of my job is to communicate about the embassy’s plans and the core values ​​of the Netherlands. It is very important to show the work that is being done around SDG 13: Climate action. A practical example of our efforts to achieve this goal is the social media spotlight we put on organizations that contribute to a cleaner, more sustainable world.

SDG 12: Responsible consumption and production represented by the Deputy Head of Mission Eva

In this photo, you see our deputy head of mission and head of the economic section, Eva, hosting one of our webinars on responsible business conduct.

Over 150 Dutch companies operate in Malaysia and many more have Malaysian suppliers. Together with them, we are working to create a safe and responsible working environment for all employees, for example by organizing a series of webinars on responsible business conduct. In doing so, we are contributing to SDG 12: responsible consumption and production.

SDG 17: Partnership for the goals represented by Ambassador Aart Jacobi

Ambassador Aart Jacobi:

“SDG 17 focuses on the need to implement and re-energize the global partnership for sustainable development. As such, SDG 17 is at the heart of a diplomat’s work. In my daily work, my colleagues and I work to create international networks between businesses, government organizations and NGOs. These vast networks in turn contribute to the exchange of knowledge and the improvement of practices. By strengthening these networks, our Embassy contributes to SDG 17: create partnerships for the Sustainable Development Goals. “

Do you want to know more about the Sustainable Development Goals and what they mean in practice? To verify THE 17 OBJECTIVES | Sustainable development (un.org)



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Here are the next steps for companies to accelerate their AI deployments https://akademija-art.net/here-are-the-next-steps-for-companies-to-accelerate-their-ai-deployments/ https://akademija-art.net/here-are-the-next-steps-for-companies-to-accelerate-their-ai-deployments/#respond Wed, 22 Sep 2021 22:59:32 +0000 https://akademija-art.net/here-are-the-next-steps-for-companies-to-accelerate-their-ai-deployments/ The use of AI in enterprises often starts slowly, from conceptual stages to pilots, through testing and eventual deployment. But as these groundbreaking projects mature and more uses of AI are discovered and encouraged, companies must constantly re-evaluate their strategies and look to accelerate their AI deployments to keep pace and aim for goals. more […]]]>

The use of AI in enterprises often starts slowly, from conceptual stages to pilots, through testing and eventual deployment. But as these groundbreaking projects mature and more uses of AI are discovered and encouraged, companies must constantly re-evaluate their strategies and look to accelerate their AI deployments to keep pace and aim for goals. more ambitious.

This is the advice of Daniel Wu, Head of Commercial Bank AI and Machine Learning at JPMorgan Chase, who presented at the virtual conference AI Hardware Summit September 15 on “Mapping the AI ​​Acceleration Landscape”.

The rapid rise and expansion of AI across all industries in recent years has been fueled by vast improvements in computing power, open and flexible software, powerful algorithms, and related advancements, but companies don’t should not remain indifferent to early AI successes, Wu said.

Instead, as more experiences are gained, now is the right time to accelerate these efforts and democratize new AI innovations to help businesses use these still-developing tools to drive their goals. and their business strategies, he said.

Daniel Wu of JPMorgan Chase at the AI ​​Hardware Summit

To further boost AI capabilities, companies need to start with the basics they already know, Wu said, including data, hardware, IT staff, governance and operations.

“I intend to try and answer this very daunting question of how we should develop AI capabilities, regardless of the size of an organization and the types of resources you have available for your organization.” Wu said. “Data, of course, gets our attention first,” with the biggest problem for data scientists and machine learning practitioners being dirty data.

“About 60% of developers think dirty data is a major problem for them, with around 30% of data scientists stating that dirty data is [adequate] the availability of usable data is a major hurdle for them, “Wu said.” So what can we learn about this? “

Such challenges with data are not new and have been around for a long time, he said. “You see data silos everywhere, cross-functional areas, with each team developing their own solution and creating their own data assets without thinking about how that data asset can be used across the organization. “

For many computer systems developed many years ago, the appropriate data models were not included in their creation, he said. At the time, only functional and performance requirements mattered, without worrying too much about how the data would be used for other purposes in the future.

But AI has changed that old approach, Wu said.

“Even today, many businesses are undergoing digital transformations and they are moving their on-premises data centers to the cloud,” he said. “During that transition there’s this awkward hybrid state where you have some of the data in the cloud and some of the on-premises data in your own private data center. Most of the time, this creates unnecessary duplicates.

To solve this problem and better prepare that data for AI use today, one strategy is to invest in data cleansing, which is a one-time upfront cost to clean the data and consolidate it. “You are trying to access this single source of truth, so when the data gets to the data scientists, they don’t have to fight between the data they should believe,” Wu said.

To make sure it works better in the future, companies need to practice data-centric design, where data needs to be a priority from the start as part of every process and technology, he said. “He shouldn’t be a second-class citizen. We should automate data processes. Many organizations still have many manual steps to perform certain steps, or scripts, to do their ETL (extract, transform, load). And part of that automation is making sure that you integrate governance and data cataloging into your process to make it an integral process.

Data also needs to be made more accessible to drive the use of AI, Wu said.

“Part of this can be enabled by creating self-service tools for organizations, for data workers, so that they can access data more easily,” he said. “Reusability should also be emphasized here. And we have to break down the silos.

These steps will also help companies save a lot of time in their model development processes, he added. “Think in terms of the feature store, which is a very popular trend going around now, those reusable features that you can use to build multiple solutions. “

Changes to accelerate AI are also needed when it comes to computing, Wu said.

“The challenges here are always about the availability, cost and efficiency of the compute, but we also have to pay attention to the carbon footprint,” he said. “People don’t guess how much of a carbon footprint there is when we train these great models. But there is hope in exploiting them.

Another trend observed is that some users are moving from very general IT architectures to more domain-specific architectures, both in cloud deployments and edge deployments, he said.

Wu also has new ideas to create more language models.

“It is not necessary for every organization to co-develop another large language model,” Wu said. “We should be geared towards exploiting what has been developed and only requiring a few improvements and tweaks to the model to that it serve a different business use case. “

Instead, companies can look to leverage a more generic layered AI model architecture for most uses, while still allowing more specific models to be built to meet specialized business cases, a. he declared.

Overall, however, it will take more than data, calculations and modeling to accelerate AI faster, Wu said.

It also requires skilled, trained and imaginative IT people who can bring their innovations to AI to help drive their business missions, he said.

“We all know about the shortage of AI talent around the world,” he said, but there is also an imbalanced distribution of talent that compounds the problem. About 50% of the country’s AI talent is found in Silicon Valley, with around 20% of those workers employed by the biggest tech companies. That doesn’t leave enough experts available for other companies to pilot their AI technologies, he said.

“This is a real challenge that we need to tackle across the community,” Wu said. To tackle the problem, companies need to find ways to reduce the burdens on their AI team by ensuring that they focus on developing models and do not address other IT overheads in their organization, he added.

“38% of organizations spend more than 50% of their data scientists’ time on operations, especially deploying their models,” he said. “And only 11% of companies can put a model into production in a week. Some 64% of them take a month or more to complete this production integration, with a model fully trained, validated and tested. For most organizations, reaching the finish line would take over a month.

These inconvenient delays and activities are happening because the support for AI operations is not there, Wu said. data-centric ideas. Think about the increase you can easily achieve by getting better data to train your models, rather than focusing on inventing another more powerful model architecture itself.

An important step in controlling these issues is to recognize the importance of managing change, while maintaining a clear lineage from your data to your model so that you can have or increase the ability to replicate your model, he said. added.

Ultimately, even after the development and deployment of an organization’s models, there are still concerns that will keep IT managers from sleeping at night, Wu said. is the risk of deploying the solution and making it available to customers? It becomes an afterthought, and it usually becomes the biggest blocker in the end and keeps the solution from going into general availability.
The challenge for companies is to try not just to think about time to market, Wu said. “You also have to think about doing it right, so that you don’t come back to the drawing board and have to redevelop your entire solution. It will be much more expensive. And meet regulatory requirements – there’s a lot of ethics around AI development that organizations need to address early on to mitigate those risks. Implement a process to guide your model development lifecycle and incorporate and streamline your compliance practice into that cycle.

In another presentation at the AI ​​Hardware Summit, Aart De Geus, President and Co-CEO of Electronic Design Automation (EDA) and Semiconductor IP Design Company, Synopsis, explained how Moore’s Law continues to be pushed to its limits in recent years and could be better replaced by the concept of “SysMoore, A blend of Moore’s long-standing legal knowledge with new technological innovations that take advantage of systemic complexity.


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Architectural pavilions: architects give punch to small structures https://akademija-art.net/architectural-pavilions-architects-give-punch-to-small-structures/ https://akademija-art.net/architectural-pavilions-architects-give-punch-to-small-structures/#respond Tue, 21 Sep 2021 02:16:10 +0000 https://akademija-art.net/architectural-pavilions-architects-give-punch-to-small-structures/ “Martell Pavilion” by SelgasCano Martell Foundation, Cognac, France For their first architectural project in France, the architects SelgasCano had to race against time. The Spanish duo only had six weeks to complete this organic, undulating structure in the courtyard of the Martell Foundation in Cognac, France. The 1,300 m² protean structure forms a labyrinthine glass […]]]>

“Martell Pavilion” by SelgasCano

Martell Foundation, Cognac, France

For their first architectural project in France, the architects SelgasCano had to race against time. The Spanish duo only had six weeks to complete this organic, undulating structure in the courtyard of the Martell Foundation in Cognac, France. The 1,300 m² protean structure forms a labyrinthine glass roof between the Art Deco Gatehouse building from 1929 and the wine cellars from the 18th century. “It’s a natural invasion – we wanted to break away from the linear perspective that connects the entrance to the founder’s house,” the architects explain, “we wanted to create a contrasting form. Tasked with designing a lightweight, self-contained set for cultural events, the architects used a toolbox of elements comprising 43 porticoes and eight different sets of curved tubular structures. A wavy, translucent canopy in polyester and fiberglass, supplied by French manufacturer Onduline, sets the tone. Yellow inflated seats filled with water are randomly installed, allowing visitors to sit, lean, stretch, or gather around site-specific cultural events. “The goal of the pavilion is to allow people to mingle and attend a diverse program of activities. A few bars and stands will welcome local producers on market days and serve cocktails “, explains Nathalie Viot, manager of the Martell Foundation,” I want the Foundation to be anchored in the region. terroir, to find the best of the region and transform it into a broad international dimension. ‘ Staged like a succession of translucent waves, the curvilinear pavilion is a labyrinth. “We hope that visitors will walk like in a forest, winding inside the structure,” say the architects. Making your way through the structure of the pavilion certainly creates expectations, even creative encounters. Committed to its local community and its environment, the Martell Foundation also explores new frontiers by reusing part of the wood from Vincent Lamouroux’s previous installation, By nature (By nature). In 2018, the pavilion will be dismantled and reinstalled abroad as part of a social and associative initiative. Photography: Iwan Baan. Screenplay: Clara Le Fort


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UCL and partners: supporting people with aphasia to better dialogue https://akademija-art.net/ucl-and-partners-supporting-people-with-aphasia-to-better-dialogue/ https://akademija-art.net/ucl-and-partners-supporting-people-with-aphasia-to-better-dialogue/#respond Tue, 07 Sep 2021 13:52:15 +0000 https://akademija-art.net/ucl-and-partners-supporting-people-with-aphasia-to-better-dialogue/ Thanks to a new course developed by UCL, a charity and arts organization, people with communication difficulties find ways to facilitate conversation. Aphasia is a serious communication difficulty that affects the way people speak, understand, read, and write words. It is something that can develop after a brain injury (most often after a stroke) and […]]]>

Thanks to a new course developed by UCL, a charity and arts organization, people with communication difficulties find ways to facilitate conversation.

Aphasia is a serious communication difficulty that affects the way people speak, understand, read, and write words. It is something that can develop after a brain injury (most often after a stroke) and 350,000 people are currently living with it in the UK.

Yet only 5% of the population has even heard of it, making what can be a very difficult condition also a very lonely place.

“Imagine not being able to talk like you can now. Not being able to order a coffee in a café, share your day with your partner, chat with your children. It is like that for people living with aphasia. They lost their language. It robs them of their ability to connect, be heard and listen, ”says UCL-based speech therapist and doctoral student Firle Beckley.

Firle was instrumental in bringing the Art of Conversation to Aphasia together, a new eight-week creative wellness course that helps people with aphasia have more successful and enjoyable conversations.

Conversation through art

Building on research from UCL’s Better Conversation Research Lab, led by Dr. Suzanne Beeke, Associate Professor, Department of Language and Cognition at UCL, the course incorporates the latest conversation training in the arts and Culture. It is hosted by Firle and artist facilitator Nikki Hafter,

“We use art to inspire conversation between the group, while also incorporating what we know from conversations from our research, to give people with aphasia, their families and friends new conversation techniques and tools.

“We create an environment in which the group watches, talks and makes art, combined with the one-on-one exploration with each couple from a video of their daily conversation to spark ideas on how they can keep their conversations flowing. .

“It’s about designing and delivering a course that integrates the knowledge of people with lived experience, as well as art, to create something outside of people’s day-to-day experience, something that allows them to do nothing. no longer think about their aphasia for a minute or two, ”says Firle.

Pool collective expertise

The Art of Conversation with Aphasia was co-designed by a team from UCL, Pavillon De La Warr and the SayAphasia association. Open to people with aphasia and their chosen family member or friend, the course brings together collective expertise on aphasia and new ideas on how to live well with it, from the arts, health and academia.

The first round of sessions, which took place in early 2021, took place on Zoom due to the pandemic, but the team is hoping to hold future classes at Pavillon De La Warr, a cultural center on the south coast.

“It has worked wonderfully online. In some ways it was more intimate when we got to see each other’s life inside our homes. But doing it face to face means people can fully participate in De La Warr’s exhibits.

“We want to give people with aphasia the confidence to participate in the cultural activities that take place on their doorstep, to know that art is also for them. “

Innovation and partnership in action

The Art of Conversation with Aphasia was funded by UCL’s Higher Education Innovation Fund (HEIF), managed by UCL Innovation & Enterprise. The project also received support from the Business and Innovation Partnerships team at UCL Innovation & Entreprise.

Commenting on the initiative, Kathryn Walsh, Executive Director, UCL Innovation & Enterprise, said: “This project is a fantastic example of knowledge exchange in action, where we were able to take UCL research and use it to create something that really makes a difference in people’s lives. Bringing together ideas from the arts, academia and the charitable sector, this project opens the door to an exciting new kind of training and therapy for people living with this debilitating disease.

Colin Lyall, founder of SayAphasia, who himself suffers from aphasia after suffering a stroke, and helped develop the program, said: “The reason I did this project was to be better and nice people to work with. I did some research on the guinea pig to try things out, but this project, great, yeah, was heard and made things better for people with aphasia.

Firle and his collaborators are now working on plans to expand the Art of Conversation with Aphasia program, with the goal of opening up the training to many more people living with the disease.

/ Public distribution. This material is from the original organization and may be ad hoc in nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View full here.


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Aerospike and Western Digital Ready to Decode Data Storage and Management at Upcoming Virtual Summit, IT News, ET CIO https://akademija-art.net/aerospike-and-western-digital-ready-to-decode-data-storage-and-management-at-upcoming-virtual-summit-it-news-et-cio/ https://akademija-art.net/aerospike-and-western-digital-ready-to-decode-data-storage-and-management-at-upcoming-virtual-summit-it-news-et-cio/#respond Fri, 27 Aug 2021 15:56:00 +0000 https://akademija-art.net/aerospike-and-western-digital-ready-to-decode-data-storage-and-management-at-upcoming-virtual-summit-it-news-et-cio/ ‘Data‘- a word that has the power to make or break business today. Data is an essential tool for business growth and an asset par excellence that a company protects with all its might. For decades, technology assistants have worked tirelessly to improve data access and management, which has given rise to the various modern […]]]>
Data‘- a word that has the power to make or break business today. Data is an essential tool for business growth and an asset par excellence that a company protects with all its might. For decades, technology assistants have worked tirelessly to improve data access and management, which has given rise to the various modern and intuitive database systems, data security solutions and technical infrastructure. that we have today. Distributed computing environments have thus taken precedence, as have the transformations of global data configurations for companies.

The challenge for today’s businesses is to manage large and rapidly growing operational data pools in real time. The need for out-of-the-box database management systems combined with a powerful composable data infrastructure has become the inevitable answer.

When AerospikeThe distributed NoSQL system is coupled with Western digitalWith OpenFlexTM composable infrastructure, organizations can help achieve these goals. The combination of Aerospike’s distributed NoSQL system and Western Digital’s OpenFlexTM composable infrastructure enables IT operators to intelligently connect disaggregated resources and manage, modify and scale these components over time. The combination is the perfect answer for IT teams to achieve productivity, agility, increased performance and faster time to market.

In this context, Aerospike and Western Digital in association with ETCIO.com are organizing an interactive virtual event, Data technology solutions on September 1, 2021, titled “Real-time Data Management with Low Latency NVME ™ Over Fabrics Technology”. The event will see the meeting of leading technical experts, as they will delve deeper into how real-time database development can be applied with disaggregated storage infrastructure to achieve remarkable performance improvements.

The long-awaited virtual event will focus on interactive experiences, ensuring highlights such as insightful seminars, knowledge-rich live discussions, virtual product booths in the exhibition hall and more. And the engagement doesn’t end there! Participants can participate in games and challenges, and claim rewards while learning more about the critical topic of data management and storage.

The event will be honored by the presence of some of the most prominent data technology veterans, joining hands to distribute golden knowledge and practical, actionable ideas. To name a few: Sridhar Sabesan, Director, Platform Engineering, Western Digital, India, Pradeep Bhomia, Head of Infrastructure Transformation (Engineering), Airtel, Naresh Rana, Senior Director, Western Digital, India; Manpreet Ahluwalia, Regional Manager, Western Digital, India ;; Aveekshith Bhushan, Managing Director, Aerospike, APAC, among others.

Be a part of this remarkable data and tech gathering, and learn more about what’s to come, by signing up here https://cio.economictimes.indiatimes.com/microsite/western-digital

Join us on September 1, 2021 from 2:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.


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Pakistan, South Korea set to develop technology to boost agricultural production https://akademija-art.net/pakistan-south-korea-set-to-develop-technology-to-boost-agricultural-production/ https://akademija-art.net/pakistan-south-korea-set-to-develop-technology-to-boost-agricultural-production/#respond Fri, 27 Aug 2021 08:11:00 +0000 https://akademija-art.net/pakistan-south-korea-set-to-develop-technology-to-boost-agricultural-production/ Syed Fakhar Imam, Minister of National Food Security and Research of Pakistan, confirmed that Pakistan and South Korea will jointly develop locally adapted technologies to help boost agricultural production RDA would like to share Korea’s best practices with Pakistan. (Image Source: Adobe Stock) KOPIA Pakistan Center and the Pakistan Agricultural Research Council (PARC) are all […]]]>

Syed Fakhar Imam, Minister of National Food Security and Research of Pakistan, confirmed that Pakistan and South Korea will jointly develop locally adapted technologies to help boost agricultural production

RDA would like to share Korea’s best practices with Pakistan. (Image Source: Adobe Stock)

KOPIA Pakistan Center and the Pakistan Agricultural Research Council (PARC) are all set to develop customized technologies and serve as a hub for sharing agricultural technology and knowledge between the two countries, said Fakhar Imam.

As stated in Pakistan today, Imam of Fakhar informed the delegation of the livestock sector in Pakistan and the need to develop value added animal products.

He expressed the hope to further improve the volume and quality of marketable agricultural products between the two countries, pledging the full support and cooperation of the Pakistani government. The two delegations agreed to expand cooperation in the field of machinery and vegetable seed production, the source said.

Korean Ambassador Suh Sangpyo said he expects Pakistani agriculture to go beyond national food self-sufficiency and donate to the global food problem.

Hur Taewoong, Administrator at the Rural Development Administration (RDA), explained that technological progress is closely linked to the economic development of a country. He said the GDR is keen to share Korea’s best practices with Pakistan.


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Pakistan, South Korea set to develop technology to boost agricultural production https://akademija-art.net/pakistan-south-korea-set-to-develop-technology-to-boost-agricultural-production-2/ https://akademija-art.net/pakistan-south-korea-set-to-develop-technology-to-boost-agricultural-production-2/#respond Fri, 27 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://akademija-art.net/pakistan-south-korea-set-to-develop-technology-to-boost-agricultural-production-2/ Syed Fakhar Imam, Minister of National Food Security and Research of Pakistan, confirmed that Pakistan and South Korea will jointly develop locally adapted technologies to help boost agricultural production RDA would like to share Korea’s best practices with Pakistan. (Image Source: Adobe Stock) KOPIA Pakistan Center and the Pakistan Agricultural Research Council (PARC) are all […]]]>

Syed Fakhar Imam, Minister of National Food Security and Research of Pakistan, confirmed that Pakistan and South Korea will jointly develop locally adapted technologies to help boost agricultural production

RDA would like to share Korea’s best practices with Pakistan. (Image Source: Adobe Stock)

KOPIA Pakistan Center and the Pakistan Agricultural Research Council (PARC) are all set to develop customized technologies and serve as a hub for sharing agricultural technology and knowledge between the two countries, said Fakhar Imam.

As stated in Pakistan today, Imam of Fakhar informed the delegation of the livestock sector in Pakistan and the need to develop value-added animal products.

He expressed the hope to further improve the volume and quality of marketable agricultural products between the two countries, pledging the full support and cooperation of the Pakistani government. The two delegations agreed to expand cooperation in the field of machinery and vegetable seed production, the source said.

Korean Ambassador Suh Sangpyo said he expects Pakistani agriculture to go beyond national food self-sufficiency and donate to the global food problem.

Hur Taewoong, Administrator at the Rural Development Administration (RDA), explained that technological progress is closely linked to the economic development of a country. He said the GDR is keen to share Korea’s best practices with Pakistan.


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CMR, Telecom News, ET Telecom https://akademija-art.net/cmr-telecom-news-et-telecom/ https://akademija-art.net/cmr-telecom-news-et-telecom/#respond Tue, 24 Aug 2021 12:10:00 +0000 https://akademija-art.net/cmr-telecom-news-et-telecom/ New Delhi: Capitalizing on the rise of remote working, learning and fun activities at home during the pandemic, the overall tablet market in India grew 13% quarter-on-quarter and Lenovo maintained the top position , according to a report Tuesday. According to CMR’s India Tablet PC Market Review report, in the second quarter of 2021, Lenovo […]]]>
New Delhi: Capitalizing on the rise of remote working, learning and fun activities at home during the pandemic, the overall tablet market in India grew 13% quarter-on-quarter and Lenovo maintained the top position , according to a report Tuesday.

According to CMR’s India Tablet PC Market Review report, in the second quarter of 2021, Lenovo led the tablet market with a 45% market share. Apple iPad shipments saw a remarkable 65% year-over-year growth.

“The Covid-19 pandemic has had an impact on the tablet market in India. Driven by regional lockdowns following the second pandemic wave, the tablet market declined in the second quarter of 2021. However, tablet shipments resumed in June, ”CMR’s Industry Intelligence Group (IIG) analyst Menka Kumari said stated in a press release.

Lenovo grew up in the region and held onto the top spot, primarily through Work from Home (WFH) and Home Learning (LFH). The best models sold at Lenovo were the M8 and M10 FHD Plus, mainly in the value for money segment (Rs 7,000 to Rs 25,000).

Samsung replaced Apple in second position for the second quarter of 2021 with 28% market share. Samsung has seen tremendous growth in its 55% QoQ market share. It also launched a new model, the Galaxy Tab S7 FE lite, to expand its overall tablet market. Galaxy Tab A 8.0 LTE (2019) series captured 11% market share.

Apple slipped to third place in the market ranking with 23% market share. Despite the volatile market dynamics, Apple’s iPad 8 achieved 10 percent market share. The new Apple iPad Pro 2021 series with new features will further strengthen Apple’s growth in the Indian tablet market.

As for chipsets, Qualcomm had a 38% market share in the tablet market. MediaTek was ranked second with 31% market share, while Apple accounted for 23% market share.


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Weekly Chancellor’s Note: August 23 https://akademija-art.net/weekly-chancellors-note-august-23/ https://akademija-art.net/weekly-chancellors-note-august-23/#respond Mon, 23 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://akademija-art.net/weekly-chancellors-note-august-23/ 23 Aug 2021 Dear collegiate community, Welcome to the second week of the fall semester 2021! We are moving forward in UNITY! With the start of the fall semester 2021, this week has offered students expanded in-person teaching opportunities. All in-person instructions have been put in place in accordance with our return to campus protocols. […]]]>

23 Aug 2021

Dear collegiate community,

Welcome to the second week of the fall semester 2021! We are moving forward in UNITY!

With the start of the fall semester 2021, this week has offered students expanded in-person teaching opportunities. All in-person instructions have been put in place in accordance with our return to campus protocols. There are hundreds of classes starting August 30. Just go here to browse the fall schedules.

On August 10, the Board of Trustees of the City College of San Francisco Foundation held a special meeting to consider a proposal to create an account to accept private funds from individuals and entities in support of studies. African Americans at FLSAC. The CCSF Foundation Board of Directors not only approved the proposal, but also committed $ 25,000 to this effort! Thank you, Foundation!

Once again, 100% of our graduates have passed the United States Registry of Radiologic Technologists (AART) Registry Exam on their first try! Passing the registry review is an incredibly difficult task. It is the culmination of more than 2 years of intensive didactic and clinical teaching. Congratulations: Elijah Chan, Tuoi Chatneuff; Jeffrey Chee, Jane Chen, Jessie Kuo, Allyson Lim, Diana Morales; Jeffrey Phan; Monica Tang; Alicia Vasey; and young you !!

In collaboration with the Web Advisory team, RiSE is organizing a Digital Equity Walk of the College’s website on September 1st. The specific goal of the Digital Equity Walk is to identify how well students can navigate the website to accomplish particular tasks (identify programs of interest, identify relevant classes, identify next steps, etc.) . What we collect during this event will inform about changes to the website. Click here to participate.

The New Student Advisory Service provides virtual counseling support and Steps to Credit online workshops for uncredited students as part of enrollment support at Ocean and each center. For general inquiries, our virtual counseling help desks are open Monday through Thursday, 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m., 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m., and here is the Zoom link to connect. Success at FLSAC starts with counseling!

In the spirit of unity, this Thursday is our board meeting at 3pm. Please join us!

Regards,

Dianna Gonzales, JD
Acting Chancellor


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